U. S. Department of Labor

Even in the absence of enterprise coverage, employees are guarded by the Fair Labor Standards Law if their work habitually entails them to trade between States, otherwise known as “interstate commerce” (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, p. 1). The FLSA safeguards individual workers who are “engaged in commerce or in the manufacture of goods for commerce” (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, p. 1). Enterprise Coverage Employees who work for certain organizations or business are protected by the FLSA. These ventures, which must have no less than two employees, are:

1. Hospital, industries offering nursing or medical care for preschools and other schools, government agencies, and residents (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, p. 1). 2. Those that have a business completed or yearly dollar volume of sales of no less than $500,000 (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, p. 1). Exempt Employees Not all employees are guarded by the Fair Labor Standard Act, as the Act exempts certain employees from its minimum wage and overtime pays provisions as well as it furthermore exempts certain employees from the overtime pay provisions only.

Overtime and Minimum Wage Pay In consonance with the provisions of the Act, the following are illustrations of employees exempt mutually from overtime and minimum wage pay requirements: 1. Professional, executive, and administrative employees, including academic personnel and teachers in secondary and elementary schools; outside sales employees; and under the definition of the Department of Labor’s regulations, some certain skilled computer professionals (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ).

2. Employees of certain seasonal recreational or amusement businesses (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 3. Employees of certain small switchboard and newspapers operators of small telephone companies (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 4. Seamen engaged on overseas vessels (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 5. Employees involved in fishing businesses (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 6. Employees involved in delivering newspaper (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n.p. ).

7. Farm workers engaged on small farms, specifically those that employed not more than 500 “man-days” of farm labor in any calendar quarter of the previous calendar year (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 8. Persons engaged as attendants to the infirm or elderly and casual babysitters (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). Overtime Pay On the other hand, the proceeding employees are examples of those employees exempt from the overtime pay requisites only:

Certain commissioned employees of service and retail institutions (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 2. Aircraft, auto, boat, truck, farm implement, or trailer salespersons engaged by non-manufacturing businesses mainly involved in selling the said items to paramount purchasers (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 3. Farm implement, auto, truck mechanics and parts-clerk engaged by non-manufacturing establishments principally involved in selling these items to paramount purchasers (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ).

4. Air carrier and railroad employees, certain workers of motor carriers, taxi drivers, seamen of American crafts, and local delivery workers paid on agreed trip rate plans (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 5. Chief engineers, news editors, and announcers of certain non-metropolitan broadcasting stations (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 6. Domestic service employees who live in their employers houses (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 7. Motion picture theatres workers (U. S. Department of Labor, 2007, n. p. ). 8. Farm workers.