The Emergency Planning and Community Right

The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986 states that governments of federal, state and local have to keep a regular vigilance over hazardous and toxic chemicals that are used in industries in manufacturing process. This is further strengthened by U. S Environmental Protection  Agency’s (EPA) Chemical Emergency Preparedness Program (CEPP). Community Right-to-Know(CRTK) puts effort in bringing awareness among general public about potential threats from hazardous chemicals.

There are mainly five kinds of hazards viz. , immediate health hazard, delayed health hazard, fire hazard, sudden pressure hazard and reactive hazard. Section 311 of EPA  details about  the current threshold quantities for hazardous chemicals. (1) For extreme hazardous substances : 500 pounds or the threshold planning quantity, whichever is lower. (2) For all other hazardous chemicals : 10,000 pounds.

Section 312 of EPA also states about threshold quantities for hazardous chemicals. (1) For extremely hazardous substances, 500 pounds or the threshold planning quantity, whichever is lower. (2) For all other hazardous chemicals : 10,000 pounds. (3) The inventory form with two-tier approach. Under Tier I, information must be provided about each hazard category. Non-compliance of threshold quantities specified by EPA invites severe penalties as per Section 325.

Penalties range from $10,000-$75,000 per violation and criminal penalties upto $50,000 or imprisonment for five years. Conclusion Industries are required to comply with Section 302 of Emergency Planning, Section 304 of Emergency notification, Section 311 and 312 of Community-Right-to-Know (CRTK)  Section 313 for toxic chemical release and Section 322, 323 reporting requirements.

Reference

The emergency planning and community right-to-know Act, Overview Accessed December 21, 2007