Political science

Course Objective: This course acquaints students with the constitutional design of state structures and institutions, and their actual working over time. The Indian Constitution accommodates conflicting impulses (of liberty and justice, territorial decentralization and a strong union, for instance) within itself. The course traces the embodiment of some of these conflicts in constitutional provisions, and shows how these have played out in political practice.

It further encourages a study of state institutions in their mutual interaction, and in interaction with the larger extra-constitutional environment. I. The Constituent Assembly and the Constitution (15 Lectures) (a) The formation of the Constituent Assembly; the philosophy of the Constitution and its main features. (b) Fundamental Rights and Directive Principles II. Organs of Government (15 Lectures) (a) The Legislature: Parliament (b) The Executive: President, Prime Minister and Governor (c) The Judiciary: The Supreme Court III. Federalism and Decentralization (15 Lectures)

(a) Centre - state relations; constitutional provisions regarding emergency and centre-state relations; special provisions for some states and the fifth and sixth schedule areas (b) Third tier of government: panchayati raj; urban local bodies IV. Security Laws (15 Lectures) (a) Preventive detention laws and constitutional exceptions (b) Extra-ordinary laws: anti-terror laws, laws against organized crimes Essential Readings I. The Constituent Assembly and the Constitution (a) The formation of the Constituent Assembly; the philosophy of the Constitution and its main features.

Austin, G. (1979) ‘The Constituent Assembly: Microcosm in Action’, in The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-25. Austin, G. (1979) ‘Conclusion: Comments on a Successful Constitution’, in The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 308330. 10 Bhargava, R. (2008) ‘Introduction: Outline of a Political Theory of the Indian Constitution’, in Bhargava, R. (ed. ) Politics and Ethics of the Indian Constitution. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-40. Chaube, S. K.

(1973) ‘The Indian Problem’, in Constituent Assembly of India. Delhi: People’s Publishing House, pp. 5-16. Chaube, S. K. (1973) ‘Constituent Assembly as the Answer’, in Constituent Assembly of India. Delhi: People’s Publishing House, pp. 17-29. Chaube, S. K. (1973) ‘Birth of the Constituent Assembly’, in Constituent Assembly of India. Delhi: People’s Publishing House, pp. 30-45. Chaube, S. K. (1973) ‘Conclusions’, in Constituent Assembly of India. Delhi: People’s Publishing House, pp. 270-281 Chaube, S. K. (1973) ‘Epilogue’, in Constituent Assembly of India. Delhi: People’s Publishing House, pp.

283-285. Jha, S. (2008) ‘Rights versus Representation: Defending Minority Interests in the Constituent Assembly’, in Bhargava, R. (ed. ) Politics and Ethics of the Indian Constitution. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 339-353. Pantham, T. (2008) ‘Gandhi and the Constitution: Parliamentary Swaraj and Village Swaraj,’ in Bhargava, R. (ed. ) Politics and Ethics of the Indian Constitution. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 59-78. (b) Fundamental Rights and Directive Principles Austin, G. (2000) ‘The Social Revolution and the First Amendment,’ in Working a Democratic Constitution.

New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 69-98. Sibal, A. (2010) ‘From “Niti” to “Nyaya”’, in Seminar, Issue 615, pp. 28-34. The Constitution of India, Bare Act with Short Notes (2011) New Delhi: Universal. [Part Fundamental Rights ; Part IV : Directive Principles of State Policy], pp. 4-16. II. Organs of Government (a) The Legislature: Parliament Agrawal, A. (2005) ‘The Indian Parliament,’ in Kapur, D. and Mehta P. B. (ed. ) Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 77-104. Shankar, B. L. and Rodrigues, V.

(2011) ‘The Changing Conception of Representation : Issues, Concerns and Institutions’, in The Indian Parliament: A Democracy at Work. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 105-173. Shankar, B. L. and Rodrigues, V. (2011) ‘The Parliament-Judiciary Relationship’, in The Indian Parliament: A Democracy at Work. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 246-291. 11 (b) The Executive: President, Prime Minister Austin, A. (2000) ‘The Governor’s Acutely Controversial Role’, in Working a Democratic Constitution. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 574-593 Baruah, S.

(2005) ‘Generals and Governors’, in Durable Disorder: Understanding the Politics of Northeast India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 59-80. Khare, H. (2003) ‘Prime Minister and Parliament: Redefining Accountability in the Age of Coalition Government’, in Mehra, A. K. and Kueck, G. W. (eds. ) The Indian Parliament: A Comparative Perspective. New Delhi: Konark Publishers, pp. 350368. Manor, J. (2005) ‘The Presidency’, in Kapur, D. and Mehta, P. B. (ed. ) Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 105-127. Manor, J.

(1994) ‘The Prime Minister and the President’, in Dua, B. D. and Manor J. (eds. ) Nehru to the Nineties : The Changing Office of the Prime Minister in India, Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, pp. 20-47. (c) The Judiciary: The Supreme Court Baxi, U. (2010) ‘The Judiciary as a Resource for Indian Democracy’, in Seminar, Issue 615, pp. 61-67. Bhushan, P. (2007) ‘Public Interest Litigation: Supreme Court in the Era of Liberalization’, in Dua, B. D. , Singh, M. P. and Saxena, R. (eds. ) Indian Judiciary and Politics: The Changing Landscape. New Delhi: Manohar, pp. 163-175. Ramchandran, R.

(2006) ‘The Supreme Court and the Basic Structure Doctrine’, in Kirpal, B. N. , Desai, A. , Subramanium, G. , Dhavan, R. , and Ramchandran, R. (eds. ) Supreme But Not Infallible: Essays in Honour of the Supreme Court of India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 107-133. Rudolph, L. I. and Rudolph, S. H. (2008) ‘Judicial Review Versus Parliamentary Sovereignty: The Struggle Over Stateness in India,’ in Explaining Indian Democracy: A Fifty Year Perspective, 1956-2006 Volume 2: The Realm Of Institutions: State Formation and Institutional Change. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 183-210. III.

Federalism and Decentralization (a) Centre - state relations; constitutional provisions regarding emergency and centrestate relations; special provisions for some states and the fifth and sixth schedule areas Arora, B. (1995) ‘Adapting Federalism to India: Multi-level and Asymmetrical Innovations’, inArora, B. and Verney, D. (eds. ) Multiple Identities in a Single State: Indian Federalism in Comparative Perspective. Delhi: Konark, pp. 71-104. Dhavan, R. and Saxena, R. (2006) ‘The Republic of India’, in Le Roy, K. , Saunders, C. and Kincaid, J. (eds. ) A Global Dialogue on Federalism. Montreal: Queen’s University Press