Drunk Driving laws in New York

New  York’s  drunken  driving  laws,  which  seem  to  be  adequate  on  paper,  but  did  not  have  sufficient  focus  and  cohesiveness  to  provide  a  substantial  measure  of  anticipation. The  combination  of  flimsy  use  of  breath  test  laws,  tolerant  plea  bargaining,  grossly  insufficient  penalties  and  be  short  of  commitment  by  the  criminal  justice  system  combined  to  lower  New  York’s  effort  for  the  tragic  consequences  of  the  drinking  driver.

As  we  know  all  the  states  have  elaborated  system  of  drunken  driving  laws,  courts,  enforcement,  and  punishment,  but  unfortunately  these  systems  do  not  work  properly. Arrest  rates  are  considerably  low  and  complex  laws  allow  some  offenders  to  escape  any  punishment. Other  offenders  can  avoid  a  drunken  driving  conviction  through  an  appeal  haggle. Sentence  requirements  are  not  completed  and  permits  are  also  not  applied  always.

But  unfortunately,  these  problems  are  not  well  known  because  state  does  not  have  good  record  systems. Drunk  drivers  have  little  fear  of  being  stopped,  convicted,  arrested,  and  punished  so  they  carry  on  drinking  and  driving. On  Drunk  Driving,  the  Senate  Special  Task  Force  came  to  know  that  New  York’s  laws  did  not  provide  strong  fines  for  drunken  driving  offenders.

And  it  also  found  that:  The  experience  of  other  states  where  ruthless  penalties  have  been  tried  such  as  obligatory  jail  for  all  convicted  drunken  driving  offenders  has  revealed  that  these  penalties  have  had  a  momentary  effect  at  best. Where  ruthless  penalties  have  been  susceptible,  they  should  not  been  applied.

Obligatory  jail  and  so  called  “hard”  license  deferments,  which  outlawed  offenders  from  holding  controlled  use  licenses,  provided  an  escape  means  for  most  drunk  drivers,  because  public  officials  have  recognized  that  efforts  to  impose  harsh  sanctions  could  decrease  the  possibility  that  drunk  drivers  would  actually  be  convicted. Instead,  New  York  stirred  away  from  a  scheme  that  focused  on  penalties  to  one  that  emphasized  higher  levels  of  enforcement  and  tribunal  that  were  coupled  with  workable  penalties  and  a  public  information  and  education  crusade.

Drunk  driving  in  New  York  has  decreased  significantly  for  the  past  two  decades. As  the  figures  below  show,  most  of  the  progress  ended  by  about  1994. In  2000,  drunken  driving  deaths  increased  for  the  first  time  since  1995. Traffic  victims  involving  alcohol  rose  by  4%,  from  15,976  in  1999  to  16,653  in  2000. The  number  of  drunk  drivers  in  fatal  crashes  rose  by  6%,  from  9,818  in  1999  to  10,408  in  2000.