South Carolina v. Katzenbach Case Brief

Facts of the case

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 prevented states from using a test or device(such as literacy tests) to deny citizens the right to vote. Under the Attorney General’s jurisdiction, federal examiners were empowered to intervene to investigate election irregularities.

CONCLUSION

The Court found that Congress was justified in limiting the operation of the Act through the use of a formula to only a handful of states because the record indicated that actual voter discrimination occurred in these states. The Court found that the temporary suspension of voter qualifications, such as literacy tests, were not unconstitutional because the record indicated that such tests were traditionally used to disenfranchise minorities and their suspension was a legitimate response to the problem. The Court found that the suspension of new voter qualifications pending review was constitutional because the record indicated that states often enacted new laws to perpetuate discrimination in the face of adverse federal court decrees.

  • Advocates: –
  • Petitioner: South Carolina
  • Respondent: Katzenbach
  • DECIDED BY:Warren Court
  • Location: South Carolina General Assembly
Citation: 383 US 301 (1966)
Argued: Jan 17 – 18, 1966
Decided: Mar 7, 1966
South Carolina v. Katzenbach Case Brief