Why This Country is Ready for a Woman President

Since the foundation of this great country men have always been the captain steering the wheel as to what direction this nation will be heading to. It is always the men who dictate the rules and policies that will govern the American people. Men basically are the ones who have the last say on how will this union of states pursue their goals for liberty and freedom. They are the ones who are always on top of this government overseeing that every needs and wants of each citizen are met and taken cared of.

Yet, on the other hand, there are questions that presently linger in American’s mind are: “Do men alone have the monopoly of talent and intelligence capable of running this country? ”; “Can women too be leaders who can perform, or even surpass, what previous head of the state did for this nation? ” “Is this nation ready for a woman president? ” It is already a long time ago when women of this country have been given the right to suffrage (Stanton et al. , 1985). During this span of time it is only now that we see women rise to the occasion of demonstrating what they are capable of doing.

Presently, we see them as activists, artists, corporate leaders, legislators, efficient non-government organization workers etc. Name any discipline and there always be successful women present in that field. What then can stop them in performing well as head of state? Looking around the globe, Britain had Margaret Thatcher, Philippines had Corazon Aquino, India had Benazir Bhutto, Indonesia had Megawati Sukarnoputri, Argentina had Isabel Martinez de Peron, and Chile has Michelle Bachelet.

If these countries are ready to have a woman as a leader what more is the United States? This great nation is always been the bastion of equality, liberty and freedom. If the question is whether America is ready for a woman leader, there can be no other answer to that than by saying that this country is always been.

Reference

Stanton, E. C. , Anthony, S. B. & Gage, M. J. (1985). History of Woman Suffrage. New York, Fowler & Wells