The Supreme Court Justices

The Supreme Court Justices

            Clarence Thomas was born in Pin Point, Georgia on June 23, 1948. Thomas grew up in poverty and spent most of his early days without his father who neglected the family during his childhood. As a young student, Thomas entered the Jesuit Institution of College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts. He was a consistent beneficiary of a black recruitment program up to his education at Yale Law School. As a young lawyer, he worked under the direction of John Danforth, who was then Massachusetts’ State Attorney General. In time, Thomas became the head of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, despite the fact that his initial aspiration was a career outside the scope of civil rights.

            Because of Thomas’ racial affinity, he eventually earned a nomination to the highest Court of the United States (OYEZ). While President George Bush assured that he favored the legal capability of Thomas, it would be a cautious endeavor on Bush to disregard the political pressures to choose a black nominee. His nomination to the Supreme Court tossed into hysteria the conventional political allegiances. Liberals, together with the Congressional Black Caucus and NAACP, were entirely bewildered (OYEZ). Their condemnation of Thomas’ conservative views contradicted with their aspiration of witnessing a black justice on the high Court. All the same, Thomas was appointed to the Supreme Court under the silhouette of affirmative action.

            Clarence Thomas has lived a life perforated with contradictions and ridicule. Even though he has opposed affirmative action programs and preferences, he nevertheless gained from them. From the time Thomas became a Supreme Court justice, he has closely associated himself with the far right of the Court and most often votes on the conservative camp’s side; and through time, Justice Clarence Thomas’ decisions on constitutional issues became well-reflected with his personal conservative views and thinking.

Reference

OYEZ. (n.d.). Clarence Thomas. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://www.oyez.org/justices/clarence_thomas/