Nicholas Grimshaw and engineering firm

The initial idea for the project dates back to 1996, with construction beginning in 1998. The work was hampered by torrential rain in the first few months of the project, and parts of the pit flooded as it sits 15m below the water table. In the first two months of construction it rained every day; 43 million gallons of rainwater drained into the pit. This prompted the engineers to come up with a magnificent subterranean drainage system that now collects all the water coming on to the site.

They use it to irrigate their plants and flush their bathrooms, while rainwater that falls on the Biomes is used to maintain the humidity inside the Rainforest Biome. Today almost half of their water needs are provided from water harvested on site. The first part of the Eden Project, the visitor center, opened to the public in May 2000. The first plants began arriving in September of that year.

The project was conceived by Tim Smit and designed by architect Nicholas Grimshaw and engineering firm Anthony Hunt and Associates, Davis Langdon carried out the project management, Sir Robert McAlpine and Alfred McAlpine did the construction, MERO designed and built the biomes, and Arup was the services engineer, economic consultant, environmental engineer and transportation engineer. Land use consultants led the master plan and landscape design. The project took 2? years to construct and opened to the public on 17 March 2001. The Eden Project The initial idea for the project dates back to 1996, with construction beginning in 1998.

The work was hampered by torrential rain in the first few months of the project, and parts of the pit flooded as it sits 15m below the water table. In the first two months of construction it rained every day; 43 million gallons of rainwater drained into the pit. This prompted the engineers to come up with a magnificent subterranean drainage system that now collects all the water coming on to the site. They use it to irrigate their plants and flush their bathrooms, while rainwater that falls on the Biomes is used to maintain the humidity inside the Rainforest Biome.

Today almost half of their water needs are provided from water harvested on site. The first part of the Eden Project, the visitor center, opened to the public in May 2000. The first plants began arriving in September of that year. The project was conceived by Tim Smit and designed by architect Nicholas Grimshaw and engineering firm Anthony Hunt and Associates, Davis Langdon carried out the project management, Sir Robert McAlpine and Alfred McAlpine did the construction, MERO designed and built the biomes, and Arup was the services engineer, economic consultant, environmental engineer and transportation engineer.

Land use consultants led the master plan and landscape design. The project took 2? years to construct and opened to the public on 17 March 2001. The Eden Project The initial idea for the project dates back to 1996, with construction beginning in 1998. The work was hampered by torrential rain in the first few months of the project, and parts of the pit flooded as it sits 15m below the water table. In the first two months of construction it rained every day; 43 million gallons of rainwater drained into the pit.

This prompted the engineers to come up with a magnificent subterranean drainage system that now collects all the water coming on to the site. They use it to irrigate their plants and flush their bathrooms, while rainwater that falls on the Biomes is used to maintain the humidity inside the Rainforest Biome. Today almost half of their water needs are provided from water harvested on site. The first part of the Eden Project, the visitor center, opened to the public in May 2000. The first plants began arriving in September of that year.

The project was conceived by Tim Smit and designed by architect Nicholas Grimshaw and engineering firm Anthony Hunt and Associates, Davis Langdon carried out the project management, Sir Robert McAlpine and Alfred McAlpine did the construction, MERO designed and built the biomes, and Arup was the services engineer, economic consultant, environmental engineer and transportation engineer. Land use consultants led the master plan and landscape design. The project took 2? years to construct and opened to the public on 17 March 2001.