Mass Media Law Definitions

 Mass Media Law refers to the collective set of laws that protect or limit media or the consumers from different issues that may arise from the use of exposure to mass media. Television, Internet, Newspapers, Magazines, and film are just some of the few examples of Mass Media that are governed by this set of laws. However, each form of Mass Media is subject to the different law s under the general heading of Mass Media law given that each form of media interacts differently with the consumers.

Mass media law is a legal field that encompasses a variety of communications industries, such as print media, film, broadcasting, and the Internet. With modern communications technologies, the mass media has the ability to affect many people in a variety of ways. The laws that govern these communications can be complicated and have far-reaching results. Many of the suits brought by media lawyers involve copyright infringement, defamation, censorship, and privacy.

Mass media law encompasses free speech law as well. In many countries, freedom of speech is a governmentally-acknowledged right of people. On the other hand, many governments have laws that allow for censoring of objectionable, sensitive, or harmful communications. Mass media lawyers may deal with the legal balance between free speech and censorship.

Media law is an area of the law which covers media communications of all sorts and sizes. Specialists in this field may work for individual companies, handling legal issues which come up in the course of doing business. They can also work for organizations which provide advocacy to people who run afoul of the law, or have private practices with consulting services and other forms of legal assistance available to clients.

Differences between the following terms applied in Law

Regulation A rule of order having the force of law, prescribed by a superior or competent authority, relating to the actions of those under the authority's control. • Regulation is a form of secondary legislation issued by a government minister under the authority of primary legislation. Regulations are used to make the detailed arrangements which give effect to the intent and purpose of primary legislation. Regulations are typically used to address matters of detail, while matters of substance are left to primary legislation. Thus, legislative assemblies need not spend as much time discussing purely technical questions and any necessary changes can be made very quickly and easily.

Precept An order, writ, warrant, or process. An order or direction, emanating from authority, to an officer or body of officers, commanding that officer or those officers to do some act within the scope of their powers. Rule imposing a standard of conduct or action. • Precept is a civil or criminal writ or warrant issued by an authorized person demanding another’s action or an order issued by legally constituted authority to a subordinate official. For example a Judge’s order to an officer to bring a party before the court.

Statute An act of a legislature that declares, proscribes, or commands something; a specific law, expressed in writing. • Statute it is a formal written enactment of a legislative authority that governs a state, city, or county. Typically, statutes command or prohibit something, or declare policy. The word is often used to distinguish law made by legislative bodies from case law, decided by courts, and regulations issued by government agencies. Statutes are sometimes referred to as legislation or "black letter law". As a source of law, statutes are considered primary authority. It may also originate with national, state legislatures or local municipalities. Statutes of lower jurisdictions are subordinate to the law of higher.

Ordinance A law, statute, or regulation enacted by a Municipal Corporation. • Ordinance is a law passed by a municipal government. A municipality, such as a city, town, village, or borough, is a political subdivision of a state within which a municipal corporation has been established to provide local government to a population in a defined area. Ordinances constitute the subject matter of municipal law. The power of municipal governments to enact ordinances is derived from the state constitution or statutes or through the legislative grant of a municipal charter.

The charter in large part dictates how much power elected officials have to regulate actions within the municipality. Municipalities that have been granted "home rule" charters by the legislature have the most authority to act. If, however, a municipality enacts an ordinance that exceeds its charter or is in conflict with state or federal law, the ordinance can be challenged in court and ruled void.

Jurisprudence From the Latin term juris prudentia, which means "the study, knowledge, or science of law"; in the United States, more broadly associated with the philosophy of law. •Jurisprudence is the theory and philosophy of law. Scholars of jurisprudence, or legal theorists, hope to obtain a deeper understanding of the nature of law, of legal reasoning, legal systems and of legal institutions.

Modern jurisprudence began in the 18th century and was focused on the first principles of the natural law, civil law, and the law of nations. General jurisprudence can be broken into categories both by the type of question scholars seek to answer and by the theories of jurisprudence, or schools of thought, regarding how those questions are best to be answered. Contemporary philosophy of law, which deals with general jurisprudence, addresses problems in two rough groups.

Canon An ecclesiastical law or code of laws established by a church council. A secular law, rule, or code of law.

•Canon law is the body of laws and regulations made or adopted by ecclesiastical authority, for the government of the Christian organization and its members. It is the internal ecclesiastical law governing the Catholic Church (both Latin Rite and Eastern Catholic Churches), the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, and the Anglican Communion of churches. The way that such church law is legislated, interpreted and at times adjudicated varies widely among these three bodies of churches. In all three traditions, a canon was initially a rule adopted by a council; these canons formed the foundation of canon law.