Major candidates

Out of the five candidates who ran in the year’s Washington State Senate Elections, two had a close fight — Maria Cantwell from the Democratic Party and Michael McGavick from the Republican Party. The three other candidates are Bruce Guthrie from the Libertarian party, Aaron Dixon from the Green Party, and independent candidate Robin Adair. Michael McGavick was born on February 7, 1958 and raised in Seattle, Washington with his two sisters Molly and Meaghan. He graduated at the University of Washington in 1983. When he graduated, he immediately worked for The Rocket Company and served there as a vice president for three years.

In 1986, he worked at the Washington Round Table again as a vice president for two years. At present, he is the chairman, president and chief executive officer of Safeco Corporation, the second largest commercial insurance operation in the United States. During the times he was growing up, his parents were active in local civics. He attributed his interest in politics to his father, Joe McGavick, the last Republican state legislator to represent Seattle’s Wallingford neighborhood since the Great Depression (Fryer).

He actually helped his father, together with his whole family, run for a state House seat in 1966. Their usual subject during dinner is politics. When they vacationed at Whidbey Island together with his father’s friend former Senator Slade Gorton’s family he would listen to his father and Gorton’s discussion about politics. At the time, he thought that this was a normal discussion over dinner until he figured out that most people don’t sit around and talk about politics all day (Fryer). At the age of 14, Mike experienced his first venture into politics.

He volunteered as Gorton’s campaign driver for the latter’s re-election bid for state attorney general in 1979. When Gorton won in that race, he followed the newly elected senator to Washington D. C. as an aide on foreign policy and military affairs (Fryer). In 1988, he served as Gorton’s campaign manager and chief of staff when the former senator staged a comeback for his re-election bid. When asked about what kind of a Republican he is, he answers, “I’m just a Republican. I’ll let everyone decide what kind. ” (Fryer)

Maria Cantwell, this year’s winning candidate, was born on October 13, 1958 in Indianapolis, Indiana. She grew up in a predominantly Irish environment in the south side of Indianapolis. Since his father was only a construction worker, she was forced to work to pay for her college education. She studied and graduated in 1980 at the Miami University of Ohio with a Bachelor in Arts in Public Administration. Her father, Paul Cantwell, was a lifelong Democratic Party activist who served as county commissioner, city councilman and state legislator (White).

As a youngster, she joined her father in rallies and meetings and door-belled houses for Election Day votes. Cantwell’s political career started as early as the age of 28. She was then elected to the Washington State Legislature. In her campaign, she knocked on every door in her district (“2002 Women of Distinction”). She was known as the leading architect of the Washington’s Growth Management Act of 1990. In 1992, she ran for Congress and became the first Democrat elected to the United States House of Representatives from Washington’s first congressional district in 40 years.

During her first term in Congress, she helped in defeating the Clipper Chip proposal by convincing the Clinton administration to drop its support for it. She also supported NAFTA, President Clinton’s 1993 budget and the Family and Medical Leave Act. She was defeated by Republican candidate Rick White in the elections in 1994, where she vowed to leave politics. It was during this time that she was offered a job to be the marketing vice president of RealNetworks. Through this, she became a multimillionaire.

She sold 110,000 shares of RealNetworks at $44 per share when she decided to return to public service and ran for Senate in 2000. In November 2000, she was elected to the US Senate and became one of the first women, along with Debbie Stabenow of Michigan, to defeat an incumbent senator. She is known to be a hard-worker with great political skills. She is passionate in fighting for environmental protections. She identifies her hard-working skills with the advice of her parents to always work hard to accomplish things.

Out of the five candidates who ran in the year’s Washington State Senate Elections, two had a close fight — Maria Cantwell from the Democratic Party and Michael McGavick from the Republican Party. The three other candidates are Bruce Guthrie from the Libertarian party, Aaron Dixon from the Green Party, and independent candidate Robin Adair. Michael McGavick was born on February 7, 1958 and raised in Seattle, Washington with his two sisters Molly and Meaghan. He graduated at the University of Washington in 1983. When he graduated, he immediately worked for The Rocket Company and served there as a vice president for three years.

In 1986, he worked at the Washington Round Table again as a vice president for two years. At present, he is the chairman, president and chief executive officer of Safeco Corporation, the second largest commercial insurance operation in the United States. During the times he was growing up, his parents were active in local civics. He attributed his interest in politics to his father, Joe McGavick, the last Republican state legislator to represent Seattle’s Wallingford neighborhood since the Great Depression (Fryer).

He actually helped his father, together with his whole family, run for a state House seat in 1966. Their usual subject during dinner is politics. When they vacationed at Whidbey Island together with his father’s friend former Senator Slade Gorton’s family he would listen to his father and Gorton’s discussion about politics. At the time, he thought that this was a normal discussion over dinner until he figured out that most people don’t sit around and talk about politics all day (Fryer). At the age of 14, Mike experienced his first venture into politics.

He volunteered as Gorton’s campaign driver for the latter’s re-election bid for state attorney general in 1979. When Gorton won in that race, he followed the newly elected senator to Washington D. C. as an aide on foreign policy and military affairs (Fryer). In 1988, he served as Gorton’s campaign manager and chief of staff when the former senator staged a comeback for his re-election bid. When asked about what kind of a Republican he is, he answers, “I’m just a Republican. I’ll let everyone decide what kind. ” (Fryer)

Maria Cantwell, this year’s winning candidate, was born on October 13, 1958 in Indianapolis, Indiana. She grew up in a predominantly Irish environment in the south side of Indianapolis. Since his father was only a construction worker, she was forced to work to pay for her college education. She studied and graduated in 1980 at the Miami University of Ohio with a Bachelor in Arts in Public Administration. Her father, Paul Cantwell, was a lifelong Democratic Party activist who served as county commissioner, city councilman and state legislator (White).

As a youngster, she joined her father in rallies and meetings and door-belled houses for Election Day votes. Cantwell’s political career started as early as the age of 28. She was then elected to the Washington State Legislature. In her campaign, she knocked on every door in her district (“2002 Women of Distinction”). She was known as the leading architect of the Washington’s Growth Management Act of 1990. In 1992, she ran for Congress and became the first Democrat elected to the United States House of Representatives from Washington’s first congressional district in 40 years.

During her first term in Congress, she helped in defeating the Clipper Chip proposal by convincing the Clinton administration to drop its support for it. She also supported NAFTA, President Clinton’s 1993 budget and the Family and Medical Leave Act. She was defeated by Republican candidate Rick White in the elections in 1994, where she vowed to leave politics. It was during this time that she was offered a job to be the marketing vice president of RealNetworks. Through this, she became a multimillionaire.

She sold 110,000 shares of RealNetworks at $44 per share when she decided to return to public service and ran for Senate in 2000. In November 2000, she was elected to the US Senate and became one of the first women, along with Debbie Stabenow of Michigan, to defeat an incumbent senator. She is known to be a hard-worker with great political skills. She is passionate in fighting for environmental protections. She identifies her hard-working skills with the advice of her parents to always work hard to accomplish things.