Industrial Revolution- Henry Ford

Definition: An assembly line is a manufacturing process in which interchangeable parts are added to a product in a sequential manner to create an end product Between 1908 and 1915, Henry Ford’s company Ford Motor Company, began to use what is now being called as the most significant technological development of the 20th century. The assembly line was first discussed by author Adam Smith in his book “The Wealth of Nations” published in 1776. However, the genius idea of an assembly line was not created by one person at one time; it has been adapted over many years.

The very first recording of assembly lines has been dated back to the making of the Terracotta Warriors. Henry Ford was the one that made the genius idea famous and still in use in millions of factories all over the world. Henry Ford’s creation “The Model T” was being sold for $850 which was expensive for its day. The car seemed to be sturdy, reliable and easy to operate and it quickly became very popular. Due to its large demand, Ford realizes that he was unable to meet the enormous demand for his cars.

Ford found his new system produced cars quickly and efficiently; so efficiently that it considerably lowered the cost of assembling the cars. He decided to pass this savings along to his customers, and in 1915 dropped the price of the Model T to $290. That year, he sold 1 million cars. The assembly line hasn’t really been developed and updated since the 20th century. However, in some car manufacturers robots can be found replacing men and larger and more intricate machines are being assembled.