How understanding cultural diversity can help promote the rights of patients

Diversity describes the range of visible and non-visible differences that people have that make them different from everyone else. Here are some examples of diversity: age, gender, ethnicity, religious beliefs, social class, sexuality, family structure and disabilities. As a patient you would have the following rights:  To be respected this means that you should be shown deferential regard and be listened to when you may a point.

To be treated equally and not discriminated against this means that you should be treated exactly the same as every patient and not be treated differently based on your sex, race etc. To be treated as an individual this means you should be listened to when you make a point and you should be respected in your views not what everyone else thinks.Treated in a dignified way this means you should be talked to in the correct manner.To be allowed privacy this means that every word exchanged between you and your GP should be completely confidential and only your GP can see your medical notes.

To be protected from danger or harm this means that anything that could be said against you or may bring you to harm is keep completely confidential between you and your GP and not shared with others members of the public.To be allowed access to information about themselves this means that you can have access to all the notes that have been made about you. To be able to communicate using their preferred methods of communication and languages this means that you have the right to talk in your own language, receiving the same kind of treatment and not be discriminated against.

To be cared for in a way that meets their needs this means that you can request the kind of treatment you believe should be provided and you have the choice to make your own decisions.To be cared for in a way that takes account of their choices and protect them this means that you can make your own decisions like discharging yourself. Care workers have a set of guidelines or values that they follow to promote the rights of patients and service users. These are known as the Care Value Base. Carers should be able to monitor their own work in relation to the Care Value Base.

Care workers will encourage equality and diversity. By doing this, they will value diversity by treating every patient that they see or treat as an individual, taking into account their abilities, likes and dislikes. They will recognise discriminatory prejudice, stereotypes and assumptions on grounds of race, gender, age, sexuality, ethnicity, disability, social class so that no patient feels threatened or discriminated against and they ensure that a patient's background or circumstances does not affect the quality of care they receive.

Carers need to ensure discrimination does not damage client care quality by doing this they do not provide different care based on a patient's age, sex, race, disability and many more. Based on the patients rights when carers encourage equality and diversity they must follow to be respected, to be treated equally and not discriminated against and to be treated as an individual on the patient's right list.