Health Care Option 1

The U. S. leads the way in many areas into the future of economy, wealth and civilization. America spends more on heath care than any other nation with quality and safety being a key focus. Nevertheless, evidence of improvement of decreased errors is limited. We lack answers to financial stability and providing quality health care to all (Becher & Chassin, 2001). Nationally, everyone is engaged in improving the quality and safety of healthcare. We need to be awakened to preventing errors and providing safer care (Laureate, 2009).

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the initiative to improve quality and safety of health care with the “Six Dimensions of Goodness in Healthcare. ” A quality and/or safety initiative Healthcare facilities are engaging in the prevention of medical errors and providing better care. Many institutions are implementing process improvement focused on six key dimensions to enhance the quality and safety in their healthcare setting (Laureate, 2009).

The six dimensions are: Safety-to avoid injury to patients from the care that is intended to help them; Timeliness-to reduce waits and harmful delays; Effectiveness-to provide services based on scientific knowledge to all who could benefit and refrain from providing services to those not likely to benefit (avoiding overuse and underuse, respectively); Efficiency-to avoid waste; Equitability-to provide care that does not vary in quality because of personal characteristics such as gender, ethnicity, geographical location, and socioeconomic status; and Patient centeredness-to provide care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values (Madhok, 2002). Reasons for the initiative The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has a growing concern about medical errors. The IOM report “Crossing the Quality Chasm,” asked for a basis change, recommending that the delivery of health care be based on six key dimensions. We have an interaction between the errors of individuals and system flaws that need to be prevented. We need to strengthen our defense systems (Madhok, 2002). The report, “To Err is Human” estimated that 44,000 Americans die per year as a result of medical errors.

More deaths occur in a given year from medical errors than from motor vehicle accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. National costs of preventable medical errors were estimated between $17 billion – $29 billion (Madhok, 2002). Healthcare institutions are embracing new initiatives for safer care based on the six dimensions. Healthcare systems are implementing the six dimensions as a basic initiative to improve quality. The IOM states that American healthcare must make vast changes to have clinically safe and quality care (Madhok, 2002). The six dimensions can influence and direct the overall process of improvement (Laureate, 2009). Payment systems such as Pay for Performance are causing facilities to incorporate the six dimensions.

Pay for Performance initiatives advocate financial rewards to hospitals demonstrating outstanding preventative and care giving practices (Sultz & Young, 2011). Poor outcomes with medication errors, skin breakdown, patient falls, isolation procedures, and drug protocols can effect payment to hospitals (Laureate Education Inc, 2009). High quality medical care at an affordable cost is a growing goal for healthcare institutions. Effective, safe, and affordable health care leads to higher patient satisfaction (Quality Initiatives, 2004). Strengths and limitations of the initiative The six dimensions encourage a strong focus on health care quality and error prevention.

They encourage policymakers, purchasers, regulators, health professionals, health care trustees, management, and consumers to commit to a national system level of process improvement for quality health care. They encourage a shared agenda to pursue safer care (Madhok, 2002). This can cause facilities wanting independence limitations. Overuse of fee-for-service has been associated with higher rates of variety of health services. Americans are fascinated with technology and often want something done whether it is the best choice of care. Health care providers accommodate consumers. A more unified system could provide better care. It could decrease spending and limit the freedom to choose any type of care one desires (Becher, & Chassin, 2001).

A fragmented healthcare system needs to come together to provide equal access and care to all U. S. citizens (Laureate, 2009). The six dimensions promote a high level of performance leading to better quality performance and a process of care measures. Healthcare is “raising the bar” for better care with enhanced collaboration, benchmarking, and facility board goals to support the dimensions (Jiang, 2010). Quality goals such as Zero central line infections & zero sepsis is encouraging a higher level of care instead of being satisfied with average outcomes of care (Jiang, 2010). Role of nursing Health care is a team sport. Nursing needs to be part of the team and be actively involved in preventing harm to patients (Laureate, 2009).

Effective leadership with health care change needs to come from those engaged in providing health care to patients (Becher & Chassi, 2001). Nursing should be a part of identifying the error cause, gathering data, and making goals to prevent subsequent errors (NCC MERP, 2002). Nursing can be more aware and involved in prevention. Nursing can adopt higher standards and have an attitude of prevention concerning errors. Patients should not ever leave a health care facility in a condition worse than they arrived. U. S. health care must improve their standards of care (Laureate, 2009). Nursing can be a part of better communication and handoff’s. The patient has often been the communication link to give report to the next caregiver (Becher, E. & Chassin, M. , 2001).

Bedside nurses need empowerment to provide care and be involved in creating policies for better care. Nurses need more education, to get more involved in National groups that can affect policy, and to participate in research. Nurses have a great responsibility for safe healthcare. They have an opportunity to make a difference (Laureate, 2009). Nursing should be a part of identifying the error cause, gathering data, and making goals to prevent subsequent errors (NCC MERP, 2002). Summary – 10 point The second IOM report “Crossing the Quality Chasm,” asked for a fundamental change, recommending that the delivery of health care in the 21st century be based on six key dimensions (Madhok, 2002).

The key dimensions are safety, effectiveness, patient centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equitability (Laureate, 2009). Healthcare systems are implementing the six dimensions as a basic initiative to improve quality and safety and direct the overall process of improvement of care (Laureate, 2009). We have an interaction between the errors of individuals and system flaws that need to be prevented. We need to strengthen our defense systems (Madhok, 2002). A fragmented healthcare system needs to come together to provide equal access and care to all U. S. citizens (Laureate, 2009). Nurses can be a large part of implementing the six dimensions. Nurses have a great responsibility for safe healthcare.

They have an opportunity to make a difference (Laureate, 2009). The six dimensions of goodness can assist the U. S. to improve quality and safety in the healthcare system. References Becher, E. & Chassin, M. (2001) Improving quality, minimizing error: Making it happen. Health Affair(20)3 68-81. Retrieved on February 5, 2011 from http://content. healthaffairs. org/content/20/3/68. full. pdf Becher, E. & Chassin, M. (2001). Improving the quality of health care: Who will lead? Health Affairs, 20(5), 1-6. Retrieved from Walden University Library website: http://web. ebscohost. com. ezp. waldenlibrary. org. Jiang, H. (2010). Enhancing quality oversight. Healthcare Executive (3) 80-83.

Retrieved from Walden University Library website: http://web. ebscohost. com. ezp. waldenlibrary. org. Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009). The context of healthcare delivery. Baltimore: Author. Madhok, R. ( 2002). Crossing the quality chasm: lessons from health care quality improvement efforts in England. PubmedCentral – Baylor University Medical Center Proceedings. Retrieved on February 6, 2011 from http://www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/pmc/articles/PMC1276338/ NCC MERP. National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention. (2002). Retrieved on February 2, 2011 from http://www. nccmerp. org/council/council2002-06-11.

htmWelcome to WritePoint, the automated review system that recognizes errors most commonly made by university students in academic essays. The system embeds comments into your paper and suggests possible changes in grammar and style. Please evaluate each comment carefully to ensure that the suggested change is appropriate for your paper, but remember that your instructor’s preferences for style and format prevail. You will also need to review your own citations and references since WritePoint capability in this area is limited. NOTE: WritePoint comments are computer-generated writing and grammar suggestions inviting the consideration and analysis of the writer; they are not infallible statements of right/wrong, and they should not be used as grading elements.

Also, at present, WritePoint cannot detect quotations or block-quotes, so comments in those areas should be ignored. Please see the other helpful writing resources in the Tutorials and Guides section of the Center for Writing Excellence. Thank you for using WritePoint. New to Health Care Health Care Vocabulary HCS/212 Professor Phelps By: Tiearia Fariss Abstract In today’s paper I will be discussing why the healthcare industry sparks an interest in my life. I will be explaining what I want to see myself doing with the healthcare industry in the near future. My readers will have a better understanding regarding why the healthcare industry is alive today.

After my readers are reading this paper they will knowhow and where they, can get valuable information in regards to today’s healthcare industry for the United States. My readers will be able to believe the compassion that I have for the field choice that I have chosen, and they will be able to see why I have chosen said such field. In today’s time and age the history of healthcare has come a long way from when healthcare first started in the 1920s. Before 1920, doctors did not know enough about diseases to really provide enough useful care to the sick people, and they did not really charge a large amount of money for the services that they rendered.

During this time there were only a handful of big employers who offered health insurance to their employees and the others that did not have insurance would have to pay for services rendered out of their pockets. During this time frame the majority of patients were seen in the privacy of their own home. Once doctors started to learn more and more about these disease and sickness they decided that it was time to charge more for their services that they were rendering to his or her patients. To help with the rise of healthcare costs, Baylor Hospital in Dallas created a system, which one might know today as Blue Cross, which was to help people pay for the medical costs. What area of healthcare should one pursue in today’s time and age one might wonder.

The world today needs more neonatal nurse to help care for these babies who are delivered. A neonatal nurse is a nurse who cares for a baby between those ages of one day old to 28 days old. A neonatal nurse is a nurse who helps and cares for babies that have been born premature with birth defects, infections, cardiac malformations, and surgical problems. According to “Neonatal Nursing Care Info. ” (2011), “Approximately 40,000 low-birth-weight infants are born annually in the United States. Because of significant medical advances and the efforts of physicians and nurses who provide for very vulnerable babies, survival rates are 10 times better than they were 15 years ago.

Neonatal nursing allows one to make a difference in the lives of infants and their families. ” Many neonatal nurses continue to hear from families and infants they have cared for throughout their lives. Neonatal nurses are the voice for the smallest and sickest of patients who have no voice. Consider a rewarding career in the neonatal nursing field and help make a difference. What are some of the positive and negative health outcomes linked to demographic indicators in the United States? There is an emerging trend toward overweight-obesity in poorer families today. This is, or course, not true in developing countries, but it is definitely seen in North America.

We have the means to mass produce unhealthy food in the United States, and this food is cheaper and easier to find today. The effect whether they are positive or negative depends on where someone lives in the world. In other countries there are not a lot of medicines or medical practices so the help that we receive here in the United States is different from that over in China or South Africa. There are many resources readily available in the United States today for individuals to learn more about health care. There are websites that one can go to and read up on the history of healthcare and how it has evolved from then to today. One can also go to a library and read a book and see how medicine has evolved in today’s day and age.

If one wants one could find a wiser person who has lived a bit longer than himself or herself and see and ask question about the medical industry from when he or she was growing up. I hope that in my paper there is a sense about why my heart and soul is so very compassionate about becoming a neonatal nurse in today’s society. I hope that during the reading of this paper I have enlightened ones knowledge with how the medical industry arose for way back in the 1920s to today. There are many areas in today’s we as people can further our education to help fill in these voids that we see every day. References 1. U. S. Healthcare History. (2013). Retrieved from http://www. staysmartstayhealthy. com/health_care_history_inthe_united_states 2. Neonatal Nursing Care Info. (2011). Retrieved from http://www. nann.

org/education/content/neonatal-nursing-career-info. html Quality initiatives in healthcare management, (2004, March). Healthcare Management. Retrieved on February 4, 2011 from http://www. expresshealthcaremgmt. com/20040331/qualitymanagement01. shtml Redman, R. (2008). Experience and expertise: how do they relate to quality and safety? Research and Theory for Nursing practice: An International Journal, 22 (4), 222-224. Retrieved from Walden University Library website: http://web. ebscohost. com. ezp. waldenlibrary. org. Sultz, H. A. , & Young, K. M. (2011). Health care USA: Understanding its organization and delivery (7th ed. ). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.