Harriet tubman

During a time period when slavery had finally come to an end, African Americans still struggled as their opportunities for equality were next to nonexistent. In this time of hardship and unfair treatment, not many of those facing these adversities had the courage to speak out on their beliefs for change. Booker T. Washington and WEB Dubois however did not possess such fears, both thoroughly stated their opinions and stood for what they believed was right. Booker T.

Washington and WEB Dubois shared a few commonalities both men were highly educated and they both expressed strong opposition against segregation. “From the time that I can remember having any thoughts about anything, I recall that I had an intense longing to learn to read. I determine, when quite a small child, that if I accomplished nothing else in life, I would in some way get enough education to enable me to read common books and newspapers” . Washington explained that the institution of slavery helped the African American gain the traits of self-reliance and self-help.

He helped African Americans realize that they had skills and could assert themselves into the economy. Washington also used humor to mask over the pain he actually feels about his origins. Such as the trope of the mask to hide his anger. For example Washington says “I am not sure of the exact date of my birth, but I suspect I must have been born somewhere and at sometime. “The Souls of Black Folk” “The function of the university is not simply to teach bread-winning, or to furnish teachers for the public schools.

or to be a centre of polite society; it is above all, to be the organ of that fine adjustment between real life, and the gaining knowledge of life, an adjustment which forms the secret of civilization (Gates & McKay 719). ” DuBois begins by discussing what it means to be a “problem. ” He says that people never come right out and ask him what it is like to be a problem; although he knows they consider him a problem because he is African American. Instead, people talk about nice African Americans they know or tell him about how they fought in the Civil War to end slavery.

DuBois is polite when people say these things. Following this introduction, DuBois recalls an incident from his childhood in New England. One day, DuBois and his school mates were exchanging visiting-cards. DuBois was shocked, when a girl who was new to the school refused his card. He realized, then, that he was different from the other children (who were, presumably, white). DuBois then decided he lived within the veil and held contempt for those who lived outside of it. After some time, DuBois’s contempt faded and he decided he would do something important with his life.

DuBois outlines the classification of the races (Egyptian, Indian, Greek, Roman, Teuton, Mongolian, and Negro) and says that the “Negro” is a seventh son with the gift of second-sight. DuBois calls the second sight a “double consciousness,” explaining that African Americans always see themselves through others’ eyes. DuBois argues the Negro is constantly striving to merge his various selves in a quest for self-conscious manhood: he wishes to be both a Negro and an American. DuBois claims that the promises of the freedom for African Americans, fought for in the Civil War, remain unfulfilled.

Thus, DuBois argues, the Negro is constantly striving to merge his various selves in a quest for self-conscious manhood: he wishes to be both a Negro and an American. DuBois claims that the promises of the freedom for African Americans, fought for in the Civil War, remain unfulfilled. Even though African Americans were given the right to vote following the war, they were disenfranchised after Reconstruction ended Cite This Essay APA (2011, 11). Souls of Black Folk. StudyMode. com. Retrieved 11, 2011, from http://www. studymode. com/essays/Souls-Of-Black-Folk-852706. html MLA MLA 7 CHICAGO