Group Policy object

The Group Policy Object oversees these Group Policy settings that are displayed in definition below. These can be connected with designated Active Directory containers, such as organizational unit’s domains or sites. Group Policy Object can manage the Security options Registry-based policies, Scripts options Software installation Folder redirection options and maintenance options (Zinman, 2004).

Group Policy Objects are processed in the following order: • Local - Any settings in the computer's local policy and latest Windows versions allow individual group policies per user accounts (Microsoft, 2014). • Site - Any Group Policies associated with the Active Directory site in which the computer resides (Microsoft, 2014).

• Domain - Any Group Policies associated with the Windows domain in which the computer resides. If multiple policies are linked to a domain, they are processed in the order set by the administrator (Microsoft, 2014).

• Organizational Unit - Group policies assigned to the Active Directory organizational unit (OU) in which the computer or user are placed. If multiple policies are linked to an OU, they are processed in the order set by the administrator (Microsoft, 2014).

Windows Server 2008 R2 introduces lot of new features related to Active Directory. One of the features of Windows Server 2008 R2 is Active Directory Administrative Center tool which used to ease the Active Directory management. Windows Server 2008 R2 ship with PowerShell 2.0 installed by default, a fact which begins to demonstrate how important a consistent command line interface is becoming to Microsoft products (Microsoft, 2014).

Group policies table for different group users and object associated with each group members. Name Membership Type Scope Permissions Jeff Universal group Admin Universal Read/Write David Universal group Admin Global Read/Write Brett Global group User Global Read Only Drew LOCAL Group User LOCAL Read Only In Huffman Trucking implements groups only in two domains SanJose & China in the forest. In SanJose, there are four groups, one group for each department. It’s really easy for administrator to monitor the network. The type of these groups is “Global security groups” because these users don’t want to connect to other domains. In China, also there are four groups, one group for each department. They are also “Global security groups” because these users don’t want to connect to other domains. References Microsoft. (2014). Group Policy processing and precedence. Retrieved from

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc785665(v=ws.10).aspx Microsoft. (2014). What's New in Security in Windows Server 2008 R2. (2014). Retrieved from http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd560640(v=ws.10).aspx

Zinman, A. (2004). Group Policy Management Console (GPMC). Retrieved from

http://www.windowsecurity.com/articles-tutorials/misc_network_security/Group-Policy-Manage ment-Console.html