Geometry Daily Life

How is geometry used in everyday life? When you're studying a subject, the science of lines and angles can seem like nothing more than a dull exercise in formulas and predictability. In reality, geometry is at work everywhere you go. Whether you're aware of it or not, geometry quite literally shapes our lives. An Ancient Science, how long has geometry been around? To answer that question, let's take a look at where geometry gets its name. Geometry is derived from the Greek words for Earth (Geo) and measure (metria). It was put into practice by the ancient Greeks and continues to be used throughout the world today.

It is the science of measuring shapes, angles, areas and distances. By the evidence the ancient Greeks left behind in their amazing ruins, such as the Parthenon, it's no doubt that they had a deep knowledge and understanding of the science of geometry. Putting Geometry to Work, if you need an example of how geometry affects you on a daily basis, you need do nothing more than take a look around. What do you see? Maybe it's a bridge. Notice the steel girders underneath? They're arranged using very specific geometry angles to give the bridge its stability.

Geometry also dictates the way your home was built, with angles and lines that make the walls sturdy and allow the roof to shed water and snow. Maybe you see some people shooting pool. Ever wonder how pool players gauge their shots? They use geometric angles to try and estimate how the balls will react once they're struck. If all this thinking gets to be too much, try drinking a can of soda. Ever wonder how they know that a can is exactly 12 oz.? There's a geometric formula that dictates the can's size so that it contains exactly the right amount. The machinery that filled the can is also based on geometric formulas.

People use similar principles when they're cooking at home. Cake pans and pots are all specific, standardized sizes that wouldn't exist if we didn't have geometry. Without geometry, we wouldn't be able to build things, manufacture things or play sports with much success. Geometry not only makes things in everyday life possible, it makes them easier by providing us with an exact science to calculate measurements of shapes, angles and areas. So the next time you're bringing a cake and soda to your pool-shooting friends that live just over the bridge, you can thank geometry for bringing it all together.

Geometry applies us to accurately calculate physical spaces. In the world, anything made use of geometrical constraints this is important application in daily life of geometry. Architecture of a thing, design, engineering, building, geometry is particularly useful in home building or improvement projects. If you need to find the floor area of a house, you need to use geometry. If you want to replace a piece of furniture, you need to calculate the amount of fabric you want, by calculating the surface area of the furniture. Geometry has applications in hobbies.

The goldfish tank water needs to have a certain volume as well as surface area in order for the fish to thrive. We can calculate the volume and surface area using geometry. Whenever you build something, you will encounter geometry. Professions such as carpentry and engineering make regular use of geometry problems. Computer aided drafting and computer graphics for video games and movies use geometry extensively. The computers do a lot of the math for us now, but the calculations they use to do their work is deeply rooted in geometry.

The Construction Industry ,Whether the purpose is to build a storage building in your back yard, a single family home, a new highway, a high-rise office complex, or the bridge by-passing Hoover Dam, the construction industry simply could not exist without the principles of Geometry. The entire industry relies first on engineers to design and plan the actual course of the job at hand. For example: In Colorado Springs, we have had two major intersections in serious need of re-design due to high accident/death rates and major traffic problems.

One project was finished a couple years ago, and the second is close to completion. In both cases, the solutions provided by each engineer called for having one road go over the other. Once the designs were approved, the actual construction has proceeded like a finely tuned machine. All work had to be done while keeping the roads open to traffic. The project nearing completion is near my home, so I have been able to watch each step in the construction plan and it has been fascinating to watch mathematics at work.

From the initial land survey, to rough layout with earth movers, to drainage work, to paving temporary lanes for traffic adjustment, to pouring concrete, to removing the old road, to working with local businesses to keep entrances accessible, to constantly painting new lines as traffic needed to be re-directed, to blocking nearby roads when ramps needed to be finalized, to actually painting the new bridge (much of it actually hand painted), to putting up traffic signals with associated new lines to properly direct traffic, to what will be final clean-up and even landscaping–each step is an application of Geometry.

Linear measures, area calculations for paint, volume calculations for concrete, strength calculations for upright supports, angles, shapes, distances, curve calculations, the issues of perpendicular upright supports and parallel lane markings–pick any Geometric topic and I can almost guarantee it was used at some point in the construction process.