Gays in the Military Review Example

The United States military should encourage the fact that gays can now openly serve for their country. Gay Americans were not always encouraged to join the U. S. military. In the past, gays were not even allowed to sign up to fight for their country because America made it illegal. Even though this is wrong, people would often use it to their advantage to get out of a draft for war. The United States military up until not to long ago, had a policy of don’t ask don’t tell. Sexual orientation should not matter when it comes to someone fighting for there home land and the people that they love.

People should not have to hide anything about themselves, especially when at war. The policy of don’t ask don’t tell often caused more problems than not within the military. Many members of the U. S. military are discharged for being gay. Joseph Rocha enlisted in the army when he was 18 but was banned by law from talking about being gay, essentially hiding his true self from his fellow soldiers. He had become an outcast rather quickly because of the difficult time he had trying to explain to other soldiers why he would not go out and party with them or be part of other soldiers lewd conversations.

He was subject to mockery and was forced to admit to his sexual orientation. Because of this, Rocha was forcibly discharged and became very ashamed of himself. The repeal of the don’t ask don’t tell policy still has not changed some situations for gay Americans. Families of the LGB service members still cannot receive benefits, like the families of heterosexual service members. Even though there was a repeal of the DADT policy, other laws still prevent families from receiving benefits solely based on sexual orientation.

This is a perfect example of how the repeal will not generate equality in the United States armed forces and the government must do more to boost equality in the military. The repeal of the don’t ask don’t tell policy still has not changed some situations for gay Americans. Families of the LGB service members still cannot receive benefits, like the families of heterosexual service members. Even though there was a repeal of the DADT policy, other laws still prevent families from receiving benefits solely based on sexual orientation.

This is a perfect example of how the repeal will not generate equality in the United States armed forces and the government must do more to boost equality in the military. Many people feel that when President Clinton came up with the don’t ask don’t tell policy, it was him trying to avoid the situation entirely. Avoiding something, especially something as serious as this, is a horrible way of getting anything done. Christine Day, a previous soldier in the U. S. military, is part of the LGB community. She told me that when she was in the army she felt awkward hiding the truth from everyone.

“We should just be able to tell everyone about ourselves. We shouldn’t have to hide anything from anyone”, she said to me. A lot of individuals, mostly straight service members, feel gays should not be allowed to be in the military. They feel it is a threat to themselves and fellow service men and woman. Since it was a law that gays were not allowed to join the army, if they did and the bunkmates or other members found out they would as well be in trouble for not saying anything. This makes many people feel uncomfortable, especially id they become friends with the soldier they know is gay, lesbian or bisexual.

James Wallace wrote about how he had no problem with gays, even gays being in the military. This was until he actually enlisted. He had two roommates who he expected were having a gay love affair, and he came to find out that they were. He did not want to say anything because he did consider them friends and didn’t think it was his business. After a while, the affair escalated and many problems were occurring and he was getting nervous for his safety. He felt that he was forced to say something to his superior and have them removed from his room.

Unfortunately they were discharged completely. Why is it such a problem that gays, lesbians and bisexual individuals want to join the military? Shouldn’t the government and political people be more worried about the people we are fighting against in the war and less about people actually trying to fight for their country? The don’t ask don’t tell policy did nothing but avoid the situation, and most people do not take enough initiative to help the problem. People need to start realizing gays are normal people, and should have every right as a fellow heterosexual American.

WORK CITED Conant, Eve. “Do Ask Do Tell. ” Newsweek 156. 14 (2010): 34-37. Academic Search Complete. Web. 28 Oct. 2012. Brocco, Maureen. “Familiar Stories: An International Suggestion For Lgb Family Military Benefits After The Repeal Of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. ” National Lawyers Guild Review 67. 3 (2010): 156-180. Academic Search Complete. Web. 28 Oct. 2012 Day, Christine. War Veteran: Personal Interview. Part of LGB community. Interviewed by Gerard Gribbon. 28 Oct. 2012 Wallace, James M. “The Military Band Against Homosexuals Should Remain. ” Essay: Web. 28 Oct. 2012.