Forensics project

In any kind of research project, a detailed study of primary and secondary literature sources is the critical element of success. Whether in forensics or other field of professional interest, literature is the major source of theoretical and practical knowledge, and the researchers’ ability to find the commonalities and identify the differences in representation of similar topics will determine the outcomes of the research activity. In case of Forensics project, ten different literature sources will be relied upon, and systematizing theoretical and practical material will be the major issue in the process of preparing the project.

Forensics Introduction In any kind of research project, a detailed study of primary and secondary literature sources is the critical element of success. Whether in forensics or other field of professional interest, literature is the major source of theoretical and practical knowledge, and the researchers’ ability to find the commonalities and identify the differences in representation of similar topics will determine the outcomes of the research activity.

In case of Forensics project, ten different literature sources will be relied upon, and systematizing theoretical and practical material will be the major issue in the process of preparing the project. In his book Battlefield: Criminal Justice, Gregg Barak sheds the light on the most controversial aspects of the modern system of criminal justice. The choice of the historical perspective and the emphasis on the role, which each criminal complexity has produced on the evolution of criminal justice in the U. S. , can be readily used to investigate the most important stages in the history of forensics in America.

This historical line is continued by Houck (2008), who seeks to understand how science works in forensics; what techniques were and are used in criminal investigation; and what the real benefits and limits of forensic science are. When combined with the results of Nickell and Fischer’s research (the book Crime Science), this theoretical and practical information creates an objective picture of the place, which forensics currently occupies in the system of criminal justice, and how each of the widely used forensic techniques can serve the needs of criminal justice.

It should be noted, that in the history of forensic science, the creation of DNA technology and the emergence of the new computer-related crimes signify the two most important stages of historical and technological development. In this context, Coleman and Swenson’s DNA In the Courtroom: A Trial Watcher’s Guide (1994) creates a general view of the major DNA technologies, their role and implications, as well as the effectiveness of the DNA interventions in different kinds of criminal investigation procedures.

In its book DNA Technology in Forensic Science, National Research Council offers a set of recommendations which forensic professionals are to follow when using DNA technologies in the process of investigating the crime. The role and importance of DNA technology in the history of forensic science is also emphasized. Rudin and Inman (2002) review the historical role of DNA from both a legal and a scientific perspective, and thus provide researchers with an opportunity to create a full picture of DNA technologies’ development in the history of forensic science.

Finally, Pickering and Bachman (2009) provide a historical review of forensic anthropology, and their book is a reliable source of information about different methods of identification, including DNA. Special attention should be paid to the role which computer crimes play in the history of forensic science. Casey and Dunne (2004) explain how computers function and how they can also be used for criminal purposes; the book also explores the ways computers can be used for identification and criminal profiling.

Kipper (2007) offers detailed information required to perform a profound forensic analysis with the help of wireless technologies. Vacca (2005) provides the readers with the brief insight into the history of computer crime, as well as the solutions to computer crime in real-life forensics. Conclusion When studying scientific literature, preserving objectivity and systematizing knowledge will be the two major issues in the process of preparing the project. While preserving objectivity is the key to producing an unbiased and well-grounded account of the current knowledge, systematization is the key to research clarity.

Thus, where researchers seek the means to perform profound research analysis, objectivity and systematization of the previous knowledge should become the two essential criteria of high quality of professional research. References Barak, G. (2007). Battlefield: Criminal justice. Greenwood Publishing Group. Casey, E. (2004). Digital evidence and computer crime: Forensic science, computers, and the Internet. Academic Press. Coleman, H. & Swenson, E. (1994). DNA in the courtroom: A trial watcher’s guide. DNA In the Courtroom. Houck, M. M. (2008). Forensic science: Modern methods of solving crime.

Greenwood Publishing Group. Kipper, G. (2007). Wireless crime and forensic investigation. CRC Press. National Research Council. (1992). DNA technology in forensic science: Summary. National Academic Press. Nickell, J. & Fischer, J. F. (1998). Crime science: Methods of forensic detection. University Press of Kentucky. Pickering, R. B. & Bachman, D. (2009). The use of forensic anthropology. CRC Press. Rudin, N. & Inman, K. (2002). An introduction to forensic DNA analysis. CRC Press. Vacca, J. R. (2005). Computer forensics: Computer crime scene investigation. Cengage Learning.