Forensic Assessment

Forensic assessment is one of the most commonly-used tools in the sphere of forensic psychology. Forensic assessment refers to psychological testing that aims to provide objective and accurate information for fair legal determinations. The findings of a forensic assessment are often used to determine whether or not a person’s wishes would be respected or punished for wrongdoing. Forensic Assessment The field of psychology is currently being integrated into other disciplines.

Forensic psychology, for instance, involves mainly the application of psychological concepts in matters that are in some way associated with the courts and legal decisions (Mart, 2006). The court may summon a clinical psychologist to determine whether a certain defendant is insane and is therefore unfit to face criminal liability. A psychologist may likewise aid police investigations by coming up with the profile of a possible suspect. Forensic assessment is one of the most commonly-used tools in the sphere of forensic psychology.

Forensic assessment refers to psychological testing that aims to provide objective and accurate information for fair legal determinations (Heilbrun, 2001). For example, it can ascertain the extent of emotional and brain damage cause by a workplace-related injury. It can also improve the objectivity of evaluations for child custody arrangements. Civil Competencies There are activities in which an individual cannot participate in unless he or she has met certain standards.

For instance, a person cannot avail of a driver’s license unless he or she is at least 16 years old, has good eyesight and has passed a driving test. For someone to be rendered proficient enough to stand trial, he or she must be able to understand what occurs at court and be able to participate in the legal process. Stringent criteria must be imposed on specific actions to ensure that unscrupulous parties will not be able to use these as venues for wrongdoing. A skill that takes place outside the courtroom, like those mentioned above, is identified as a civil competence.

According to the textbook, it is “(the aspect) of legal competence (which) extends to many kinds of decisions that individuals are called on to make throughout their lives” (Greene, Heilburn, Fortune and Nietzel, 2006). The concept of civil competence aims to determine whether an individual has the capacity to make an informed choice about how a given situation should be dealt with (Greene, Heilburn, Fortune and Nietzel, 2006). It is therefore impossible to issue a driver’s license to a five-year-old child – he or she still does not understand even the most basic road signs and symbols.