Federal government of the United States

General Course information| I. GENERAL COURSE INFORMATIONCourse Number: POLS1800Course Title: Government of the United StatesCredit Hours: 3Prerequisites: NoneDivision/Discipline: Liberal Arts and Sciences/Political ScienceCourse Description: A study of the Constitution of the United States and the organizations, powers, and functions of the national government. In addition, current problems and policy and the role of the individual will be studied. | | | COURSE AS VIEWED IN TOTAL CURRICULUM| II.

CLASSROOM POLICYStudents and faculty of Barton Community College constitute a special community engaged in the process of education. The college assumes that its students and faculty will demonstrate a code of personal honor that is based upon courtesy, integrity, common sense, and respect for others both within and outside the classroom. The College reserves the right to suspend a student for conduct that is detrimental to the College’s educational endeavors as outlined in the College Catalog. Bartonline- Ange Sullivan, Assoc.

Dean, [email protected], or 785-784-6606Students who officially drop a BARTONline course are entitled to a 100% refund of their enrollment fee only during the first seven calendar days of the course. It is the student's responsibility to drop a course by using the drop/add feature found on the students BARTONline home page. No refund of fees is given after the first seven calendar days of online classes; the student is responsible for the total fees incurred. The College reserves the right to suspend a student for conduct that is detrimental to the College’s educational endeavors as outlined in the current College Catalog.

For any educational needs to enhance learning or for any special needs, please inform your instructor as soon as possible. Adjustments or enhancements of learning may be able to be incorporated into the course for improved student learning. Anyone seeking an accommodation under provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act should notify Student Support Services. Plagiarism on any academic endeavors at Barton Community College will not be tolerated. Learn the rules of, and avoid instances of, intentional or unintentional plagiarism.

Anyone seeking an accommodation under provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act should notify Student Support Services. III. COURSE AS VIEWED IN THE TOTAL CURRICULUM US Government is an approved general education course at Barton County Community College (BCCC), which can be used to fulfill degree requirements as a breadth social science course in the social behavioral sciences. This course transfers well and may be used to help fulfill credits and course requirements for general education at most Kansas Regent Universities.

However, general education requirements vary among institutions, and perhaps even among departments, colleges or programs within an institution. Also, the requirements may change from time to time and without notification. Therefore, it shall be the student's responsibility to obtain relevant information from intended transfer institutions during his/her tenure at Barton County Community College (BCCC) to insure that he/she enrolls in the most appropriate set of courses for the transfer program. | | | ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING / COURSE OUTCOMES| IV.

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING/COURSE OUTCOMESBarton Community College is committed to the assessment of student learning and to quality education. Assessment activities provide a means to develop an understanding of how students learn, what they know, and what they can do with their knowledge. Results from these various activities guide Barton, as a learning college, in finding ways to improve student learning. This course is intended to teach students how to:1. Become responsible citizens. 2. Identify personal values. 3. Develop political values. Students will also learn how to:1. Read political articles. 2.

Write about politics. 3. Do political research. | | | COURSE COMPETENCIES| V. COURSE COMPETENCIESA. Grasp the historical background of the American political system and understand the current political basis of the United States. B. They will be able to delineate and explain the differences in federal, state and local governmental structures and powers. C. Students will know major case law (such as Marbury vs. Madison, etc) and be able to explain in writing the legal doctrines articulated therein. D. They will know and understand common political and legal terms such as Stare decisis, quid pro quo, etc. E.

Students will use a critical analysis approach to examine, discuss and write about social and political issues as they relate to the political process. F. Students will be able to recognize the value of dissent and the preciousness of consensus within our system and why some methods work while others are less effective. G. They will understand how conflict has defined and shape America society. H. Critical thinking skills will be honed through exploring past policies and views compared and contrasted with present issues and policies. Core competencies located at end in Course Outline| | | INSTRUCTOR EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS| VI.

INSTRUCTOR EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS ON-LINEBCCC distance learning classes are designed in weekly blocks. This concept allows the student to complete the assignments any time during the seven-day block period. Students are expected to complete all required reading, submit completed projects, post module essay entries and participate in required threaded discussions on a weekly basis. Work that is submitted late (after 2400 MST on the last day of the weekly block, Sunday) will be posted as a score of zero - F. You will not be allowed to enter a unit after it closes. Participating is a key element to success.

In the event of technical problems or natural disaster contact the instructor to inform, even if you contact the Help Desk. In the event of technical problems or natural disaster contact your particular instructor (please choose the instructor you are assigned to for the best timing and communication for your need) by email first. For any reason you need to drop this class, you are responsible to follow to proper procedures. Your instructor cannot drop you from class. The instructor expects tolerance for alternate and different points of view which may be held by some members of the class.

Contacting the InstructorYou can reach me at [email protected] com. Please note I check my e-mail once a day in the evening. I should respond to comment within two days. I will not be checking e-mails on a regular basis over the weekend! I suggested you start on units early to prevent any Sunday night malfunctions at 2300hrs and not get a grade for the work. | | | REQUIRED TEXT| VII. REQUIRED TEXT AND SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS USED IN THE COURS EThe Challenge of Democracy Essentials: American Government in Global Politics, 8th EditionKenneth Janda - Northwestern University, Jeffrey M.

Berry - Tufts University, Jerry Goldman - Northwestern University,Kevin W. Hula - Loyola College in MarylandISBN-10: 1111341915 ISBN-13: 9781111341916 Click the following link: Bartonline Bookstore http://bartonccc. textbookx. com (or any place of your choosing as long as you have the correct book for the beginning of class. ) | | | REFERENCES| VIII. REFERENCES:Additional Materials supplied by the instructor. Links to Web sites provided with the on-line course content. Click the following link to access the Challenge of Democracy.

website: www. cengagelearning. com/ wadsworthNote: Please note that I would like to give credit for the Introductions to the chapters for this webcourse. The material is a combination of information from Thomson website link. | | | METHODS OF INSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION| IX. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION AND EVALUATIONYour grade will be based on accumulated points for all the units. NO LATE WORK IS ACCEPTED!!!!!!! Work that is submitted late (after 2400 MST on the last day of the weekly block, Sunday) will be posted as a score of zero - F.

You will not be allowed to enter a unit after it closes. Participating is a key element to success. Students have at least seven days to complete a unit, there is no reason that you can not complete the assignments in the given time period. It is imperative that you come to class having read the assigned chapters. With such preparation, you will be able to relate to and/or identify any problem areas that need to be addressed. Grading scale: Evaluation Method:90-100 = A Exams 1-4 33 %80-89 = B Module Essays and Module Essay Quizzes 27 %70-79 =.

C Online,pre/post Quiz 2. 5 %60-69 = D Learning Web Project 8. 3 %< 60 = F Threaded Discussion 29. 2 %The course grade is based on projects/essays, threaded discussions, quizzes, and course home exercises. The project, a Learning overview and weblink is worth 100 points (Due in Module 5). For more specific guidelines, see the directions (Webliography) in unit 3 or unit 5. Grading rubrics are available for assignments along with examples in the units. The Group threaded discussions in each module are worth 19. 5 points.

For more specific information about the grading for Group threaded discussions, see the doc sharing portion and the specific grading rubric. The threads will contain two Topics / questions for each module. To achieve an A you will need to take part in all of the topics listed for a particular week with at least two posts per topic as an initial submission by Wednesday; then you must submit a response to each topic by Sunday of each week. There is a module essay and module essay quiz in alternating modules worth 20 points. The first week is devoted to the course home unit.

The purpose of the course home unit is for the student to become familiarized with Bartonline and the course. Within the course home, there are 3 assignments: a hello thread, a quiz on academic integrity , and a quiz about Bartonline. There is a Pre-Quiz (course home) and a Post-Quiz (the Post - Quiz is in Module 16). We also have the course mistake section which is optional (unit 13) and worth a maximum of 10 extra credit points. | | | ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS| X. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTSClass attendance in BCCC distance learning classes is measured primarily by student participation in Threaded Discussion.

Submission of weekly assignments - module essay entries are additional methods to evaluate class attendance. Timely submission of assignments and participation in discussions will be a major factor in your final course grade. Weekly participation in threaded discussion and essay entries is expected. Post entries often and early. Work that is submitted late (after 2400 MST on the last day of the weekly block, Monday) will be posted as a score of zero - F. In the event of technical problems or natural disaster contact the instructor viaE-mail to [email protected]

com Please put POLS 1800 GOVT in the subject. Courteous participation in class thread discussions is the standard. Disruptive and/or offensive behavior in the electronic medium will not be tolerated. | | | COURSE OUTLINE| XI. COURSE OUTLINE The course is built around sixteen units. A unit begins on Monday and ends on Sunday. All work is due by Sunday 2400 Hrs MT. POLS 1800, US GovernmentDistance Learning Course OutlineSixteen ModulesSelect Outline Only and Print - Landscape property when printing Date| Competency| Reading Assignment| Topics| Module OneJune 6-12| Dilemmas of Democracy * 1.

Explain why American government, although familiar to its own citizens, is unique among other global democratic political systems in terms of both politics and policy outcomes. 2. Explain that American democracy's distinctiveness is a product of two closely related factors: the Constitution and the citizenry's opinions and values. 3. Maintaining order and Equality | II. Challenges Chapter 1| IntroductionAdministrationLectureEssay | Module Two June 6-12| The American System: The Constitution1. Differentiate between "representative" and "direct" democracy, noting the advantages and disadvantages of each type.

2. Define and summarize the major constitutional components, political processes, and strengths and weaknesses of presidential and parliamentary democratic systems. 3. Introduce and discuss common misconceptions about American politics and government. 4. Explain the notion of "higher law" by which the colonists felt they were entitled to certain "natural rights" and list and explain these rights. 5. Compare the basis on which the colonists felt a government could be legitimate with the basis of legitimacy in monarchies like that in Great Britain at the time. 6.

List and discuss the shortcomings of government under the Articles of Confederation. 7. Explain how the politics of the period contributed to the sense of urgency underlying the Constitutional Convention and the politics of the drafting. 8. Discuss the backgrounds of the writers of the Constitution, and explain why these men tended to be rather mistrustful of democracy in its classic sense. 9. Compare and contrast the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan, and show how they led to the "Great Compromise.

” 10. Show how James Madison's notions of human nature played an important role in the framing of the Constitution. 11. Explain how conceptions of human nature contributed to opinions for and against the Constitutional framing of government power. 12. Explain why a bill of rights was not included in the Constitution. Then explain why one was added. 13. Explain how addressing the question of slavery in any definitive way might have affected the framing of the Constitution and the fight over ratification. 14. Summarize Charles Beard's analysis of the economic motivations of the Framers, and summarize the counter analyses of those who disagree with Beard. | II.

Challenges Chapter 2| LectureThreaded DiscussionEssay| Module Three June 13-19| The American System:Federalism * Understand how the division of power between national and state governments has evolved through judicial interpretation and the practice of government. * Explain how the structure of the federal system affects the application of the Bill of Rights. * Explain the difference between federal and centralized systems of government, and give examples of each. * Show how competing political interest at the Constitutional Convention led to the adoption of a federal system, but one that was not clearly defined.

* Outline ways in which the courts interpreted national and state powers, and explain how the doctrine of "Dual federalism" came to be a dead letter of the law. * . Give the reasons why federal grants-in-aid to the states have been politically popular, and what have proved to be the pitfalls of such grants. -. Distinguish between categorical grants and block grants or general revenue sharing. -. Explain why, despite repeated attempts to reverse the trend, categorical grants have continued to grow more rapidly than block grants. -.

Distinguish between mandates and conditions of aid with respects to federal grant programs to state and localities. -. Discuss whether or to what extent federal grants to the states have succeeded in creating uniform national policies comparable to those of centralized governments. | II. ChallengesChapter 3| LectureThreaded DiscussionEssayWeb Project topic ONLY EMAIL Congress| Module Four June 13-19| Links between People and Government: Public Opinion, Political Socialization and Media1. List the sources of our political attitudes, and indicate which the most important sources are.

2. Explain why there is no single cleavage between liberals and conservatives in this country and why there are crosscutting cleavages. Explain the significance of these facts. Assess the significance of race in explaining political attitudes. 3. Define the term political ideology and give reasons why most Americans do not think ideologically. Summarize four ideological groups that provide consistency to beliefs. Describe the major "policy packages" in the Democratic Party and indicate which groups in the Democratic coalition can be identified with each package. 4.

Identify which "elite groups" have become liberal, and compare their present attitudes with the past political preferences of these groups. Discuss the "New Class " theory as an explanation for changes in attitudes. Analyze why these changes are causing strain in the political party system. 5. List the sources of our political attitudes, and indicate which the most important sources are. 6. Explain briefly how polls are conducted and how to interpret poll results. 7. Describe the evolution of journalism in American political history, and indicate the differences between the party press and the mass media of today.

8. Demonstrate how the characteristics of the electronic media have affected the actions of public officials and candidates for national office. 9. Show the impact of the pattern of ownership and control of the media on the dissemination of news and how wire services and networks have affected national news coverage. Discuss the impact of the "national press. ”10. Describe the rules that govern the media, and contrast the regulation of electronic and print media. Discuss the impact of libel laws on freedom of the press and of "fairness" rules on broadcasters. 11.

Assess the impact of the media on politics, and indicate why it is so difficult to find evidence that can be used to make a meaningful and accurate assessment. 12. Explain why the executive branch probably benefits at the expense of Congress. 13. Evaluate the impact of the media on public opinion politics. 14. Describe how news media professionals and public officials interact to "make the news". Explain the relationship between public opinion and the courts. | II. ChallengesChapter 4| LectureEssayFirst Exam| Date| Competency| Reading Assignment| Topics| Module Five June 20- 26| Participation and Voting1.

Explain why elections in the United States are both more democratic and less democratic than those of other countries. 2. Show how control of elections has shifted from the states to the federal government, and explain what effects that shift has had on blacks, women, and youth. 3. Argue both sides of the debate over how much of a decline in voter turnout have occurred over the past century, as well as those factors that tend to hold down voter turnout. | II. ChallengesChapter 5| LectureEssayWEB Project (see rubric and example in unit 3,5)| Module Six June 20-26 | Political Parties, Campaigns and Elections1.

Define the term political party and contrast the structure of European and American parties, paying particular attention to the federal structure of the American system and the concept of party identification. 2. Trace the development of the party system through its four periods, and offer reasons why parties have been in decline since the New Deal period. 3. Describe the structure of a major party and distinguish powerful from powerless party organs. Discuss the difference between "representational" and "organizational" party structures, and indicate why the Democrats use one system and Republicans another.

4. Define intraparty democracy and indicate its effect on the Democratic nominating conventions in the last few contests. Evaluate the relative strengths of state party bosses in recent years, and discuss the increasing importance of primaries in relation to the "boss" system at conventions. 5. Describe the machine, discuss its functions, and trace its decline. Contrast its structure with that of ideological and reform parties. 6. Offer two explanations for the persistence of the two-party system. Explain why minor parties form, and discuss different kinds of parties.

Analyze why they are so rarely successful 7. Describe some of the issue differences between delegates at Democratic and Republican conventions, and indicate whether there are major differences between the parities. 8. Demonstrate the differences between the party-oriented campaigns of the nineteenth century and the candidate-oriented ones of today, explaining the major elements of a successful campaign for office today. 9. Discuss the partisan effects of campaigns, or why the party with the most registered voters doesn't always win the election. 10.

Define the term realigning election and discuss the major examples of such elections in the past as well as recent debates over whether realignment is again underway. 11. Describe what the Democrats and the Republicans must do to put together a successful national coalition to achieve political power in the United States. 12. Outline the major arguments of either side of the question of whether elections result in major changes in public in the United States. 13. Discuss the importance of campaign funding to election outcomes, and the major sources of such funding under current law.

Consider how successful reform legislation has been in purifying United States elections of improper monetary influences. | II. ChallengesChapter 6| LectureThreaded DiscussionEssay | Module SevenJune 27-July 3 | Interest Groups 1. Explain why the characteristics of American society and government encourage a multiplicity of interest groups, and compare the American and British experiences. 2. Indicate the historical conditions under which interest groups are likely to form, and specify the kinds of organizations Americans are most likely to join.

3. Describe relations between leaders and rank-and-file members of interest groups, showing why the sentiments of members may not determine the actions of leaders. 4. Describe several methods that interest groups use to formulate and carry out their political objectives, especially the lobbying techniques used to gain public support. Explain why courts have become an important forum for "public interest" groups. 5. List the laws regulating conflict of interest, and describe the problems involved with "revolving door" government employment. | II.

Challenges Chapter 7| LectureThreaded DiscussionEssay | Module Eight June 27 - July 3| Congress:1. Explain the differences between Congress and Parliament. 2. Describe the role that the Framers expected Congress to play. 3. Describe the characteristics of members of Congress. 4. Describe the process for electing members of Congress. 5. Identify the function that party affiliation plays in the organization of Congress. 6. Explain the impact of committee reform on the organization of Congress. 7. Describe the process by which a bill becomes a law. 8.

Explain the ethical problems confronting Congress. | II. ChallengesChapter 8| LectureEssaySecond Exam| Date| Competency| Reading Assignment| Topics| Module NineJuly 4- 10 | Describe the institutions of Government: Presidency 1. Distinguish between the roles of president and prime minister. 2. Describe the concerns of the Founders regarding a strong executive. 3. Describe the role of the Electoral College in the election of a president. 4. Describe the organization of the president. 5. Discuss the challenges presidents face in exercising the power to persuade their various constituencies. 6.

Describe the factors that affect the degree of success the president has in his relations with Congress. 7. Describe the role of the vice-president and the problems associated with presidential succession. 8. Discuss presidential effectiveness in dealing with foreign and economic policy| | II. ChallengesChapter 9| LectureThreaded DiscussionEssay | Module Ten July 4-10 | | The Judiciary (Courts) 1. How has the Supreme Court used the Fourteenth Amendment to expand coverage in the federal system? 2. Describe the incorporation doctrine and indicate how the Court has applied it. Also, discuss the importance of the due-process clause.

3. Discuss the significance of Miranda v. Arizona and how that case illustrates the due-process principle. 4. Discuss the meaning and significance of judicial review and its relationship toMarbury v. Madison. 5. Summarize the three historical eras in the evolution of the federal courts. 6. Describe the partisan influences on federal judicial appointments. 7. Describe how the nature of federalism affects the jurisdiction of federal and state courts. 8. Discuss the ways in which cases can get to the Supreme Court. 9. Describe the financial and non-financial obstacles to getting into federal court.

10. Explain how political scientists classify justices as liberal or conservative and why they do so. 11. Enumerate four measures of judicial power and describe how judicial power can be restrained by Congress and by public opinion. 12. Develop arguments for and against an activist Supreme Court. 13. Explain the relationship between public opinion and the courts. 14. Explain the reasons behind the Supreme Court's protective attitude toward freedom of expression. 15. Explain how the structure of the federal system affects the application of the Bill of Rights.

How has the Supreme Court used the Fourteenth Amendment to expand coverage in the federal system? Describe the incorporation doctrine and indicate how the Court has applied it. Also, discuss the importance of the due-process clause. | | II. ChallengesChapter 11| LectureThreaded Discussion Essay | Module Eleven July 11-17| Civil Liberties1. Distinguish between civil rights and civil liberties. 2. Summarize the historic importance of the Brown decision in 1954 as well as the 1964 Civil Rights Act. 3. Describe some of the similarities and/or differences between the black movement and the women’s movement.

Also, be able to discuss the related issues involving the draft, abortion, and the Equal Rights Amendment. | | | II. ChallengesChapter 12| LectureThreaded DiscussionEssay | Module TwelveJuly 11-17| Civil Liberties (continued)1. Compare the free exercise and establishment clauses in terms of religious freedom. | II. ChallengesChapter 12| LectureEssayThird Exam| Date| Competency| Reading Assignment| Topics| Module Thirteen July 18-24| Civil Rights and Equality * Summarize the historic importance of the Brown decision in 1954 as well as the 1964 Civil Rights Act. * Explain the past and present relationship between liberty and equality.

| II. ChallengesChapter 13| LectureEssay | Module Fourteen July 18-24| Civil Rights and Equality (continued) * Summarize the historic importance of the Brown decision in 1954 as well as the 1964 Civil Rights Act. * Explain the past and present relationship between liberty and equality. | II. ChallengesChapter 13| LectureThreaded DiscussionEssay | Module Fifteen July 25-31| Bureaucracy 1. Describe the restraints on the growth of government. 2. Provide a historical overview of the growth of bureaucracy in the United States. 3. Describe the characteristics of the bureaucracy today. 4.

Distinguish among types of agencies. 5. Describe external constraints on the agencies. 6. Identify bureaucratic "pathologies. " | II. ChallengesChapter 10| LectureEssay| Module Sixteen July 25-31| Policy Making and Budget 1. Explain how foreign and military public policy is affected by the constitutional system, public opinion, and policy leaders. 2. Discuss the changes that have resulted from an international order that is unipolar and that is aware of the importance of terrorist activities. 3. Identify and explain the different kinds of collations that emerge around different foreign and military policy issues.

4. Discuss the changes that have resulted from an international order that is unipolar and that is aware of the importance of terrorist activities. 5. Explain how public policy is mainly the result of the constitutional system, explaining how issues enter onto the political agenda 6. Discuss the major actors and policy decisions to be made about economic policy. 7. Identify and compare the four kinds of policy coalitions that form around issues. Discuss how they affect outcomes. | II. ChallengesChapter 14| LectureThreaded DiscussionEssayFinal Exam.