Crime Causation Theories

“Most of the employees and all of the customers who commit workplace violence believe they have been mistreated by the organization and/or specific members therein. ” This was how Collins, Ricks, and Van Meter (2000) defined Strain Theory, one of several theories which attempt to explain the causes of violent crimes. This theory suggests that people commit crimes in order to free themselves of the strains or stresses that result from their experiences. Strain is experienced by people of all ages. Children and adolescents suffer from strain due to parental abuse.

They get rid of their strain by running away from home. They live on the street and later engage in petty crimes to feed themselves. Other people experience strain as a result of being bullied or harassed by others. The usual reaction of such people is to resort to violence to seek an end to the bullying and harassment. If not defense, revenge is therefore their motive in committing the violent or criminal act (law. jrank. org, 2008). The workplace could be a source of two types of strain according to the general strain theory advanced by Robert Agnew in 1992.

The first type of strain results when an individual is prevented by others from achieving his or her goal. The second occurs when an individual is deprived of things which he or she values. Agnew maintained that two things are involved in these two types of strain, namely: status and/or respect, and money. The desire for respect or status is believed to be generally associated with the yearning for “masculine status” (or to be treated like a real, tough man) which concerns men who have difficulty in satisfying such a need maybe because of their slight stature or their being members of minority groups.

The result is for them to try to achieve this masculine status by resorting to violent acts. Money is the other cause of strain. When workers are not satisfied with their financial condition because their salaries are not enough to pay for their wants and needs, illegal means appear to be their favored recourse. Either they commit fraud, or rob the company they are working for. Money is also the reason behind the violent acts of customers who believe that they have been robbed by companies who have sold them defective products or have charged them with services they never received

(law. jrank. org. , 2008). References Collins, P. A. , Ricks, T. A. , & Van Meter, C. W. (2000). Principles of Security and Crime Prevention, Fourth Edition. Anderson Publishing Company. law. jrank. org. (2008). Crime Causation: Sociological Theories – Strain Theory. Retrieved February 14, 2008 from http://law. jrank. org/pages/814/Crime-Causation-Sociological-Theories-Strain-theory. html