Convicted Felons Returning Home from Jail and/or Prison with No Options

Abstract

This paper is a final exam of a social justice advocacy issue. This paper will discuss the plan of the advocacy intervention of the social justice. The social justice advocacy issue that will be covered in this paper is on the convict felons who return home from jails and / or prison but have no options to do with their lives. This paper will demonstrates the interventions that are needed for helping the convict felons who return home but have no options with their lives. The structure of this exam paper is to cover the introduction of the selected social justice advocacy issue and the plan of the advocacy program. The paper will also discuss the need statement of the selected social justice advocacy issue and the macro level advocacy of the issue. The paper will lastly demonstrate the plan in which the selected social justice advocacy issue will be implemented.

IntroductionThe selected social justice advocacy issue that will be discussed in this final exam is on the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option. Many convicted felons are often faced with many challenges after they return home from jail and/or prison. One of the biggest and overlooked challenges that are often faced by the convicted felons who have returned home is the challenge of finding accommodation since the convicted felons have to find where to live once they return home. The convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are faced with the challenge since it is difficult to find stable accommodation due to many law restrictions. Some of the reasons that make the convicted felons to be challenged in finding housing are because, the convicted felons lack financial resources needed in finding the housing especially in the market for private housing even though the market for private housing constitutes 97% of the stock of the total housing in the U.S. (Bradley et al., 2001). The convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are also barred by the federal laws from getting public housing and the housing programs that are assisted by the federal.

            The intervention that should be done in order to avoid relapse and recidivism of the returned convicted felons is by ensuring that they have access to stable and cheap housing. By providing affordable housing for convicted felons that have returned home from the prison will help and enhance the transition process for the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option back into the community. By providing affordable houses for the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option instead of the temporary houses will help in the reduction of drug use among them. This intervention process will also help the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option in finding new jobs to help them support themselves and their families. When good interventions programs are implemented in the society, many ex-convicted felons will be able to adapt to the society therefore reducing the rates of the recidivism (Seiter & Kadela, 2003).

Need statementMany convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are perceived by the society to be people who are a risk in the safety of the society. Since the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are faced by the challenge of being accepted in the society, they are faced with a big challenge of finding affordable and stable accommodation. Many people who have a bad perception of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are the federal since they exclude the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option from getting public housing and other housing programs that are assisted by the federal. The reasons why the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are challenged in getting affordable accommodation is due to fact that they lack financial resources needed in finding the housing especially in the market for private housing even though the market for private housing constitutes 97% of the stock of the total housing in the U.S. (Bradley et al., 2001).

The community is usually affected when the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are involved in the recidivism (Bigelow, 2008, p. 17). The society has a poor perception of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option which make them not to fully accept them back into the society. Many people believe that the people who involved in the sex crimes in the society are the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option therefore leading to them being tracked once they are in the society. The convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option have also had challenges such as restrictions of living in places that are close to public places such as schools, playgrounds and parks among others since such places are dominated by children (Levenson et al., 2007).

The convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are also not allowed to live in rental properties since it is crime for many of the landlords when they rent houses to the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option. This has been put in place since many of the people have disallowed the landlords from renting the premises to the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option (Levenson et al., 2007). The convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are mostly faced with the challenges of locating where to live (Petersilia, 2003). The convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option usually do not get support systems, employment opportunities, and transportation and financial resources since when they are imprisoned they are often separated from the community and their families (Levenson et al., 2007).

Since the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are faced with the challenge of getting employments, they are not able to meet their financial stabilities and therefore lack of affordable housing (Levenson et al., 2007). This is also enhanced with the laws that have been placed by the federal that are prohibiting the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option from obtaining housing that is subsidized (Travis, 2005). The convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option have also been faced with the challenges of obtaining the basic needs and many people in the society have also ignored the challenges that are faced with the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option. Since many of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are faced with the challenges re-entry into the society, they end up with recidivism (Levenson et al., 2007). Many convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option have also found themselves homeless due to the challenges that they have faced. For example in a survey that was done in 1997 by the correction department in California 10% of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option were homeless (CDC, 1997).

Macro Level AdvocacyThe social justice advocacy that is discussed in this paper in on the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option and in this issue people in the society and the government should be able support the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option in order to reduce the recidivism rates. The society should ensure that all the people in the society live in good conditions including the convicts and the ex-convicts and in this way the macro level advocacy will be met in the society. One way in which the society can ensure a well re-entry of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option is by ensuring that the correction department staffs are trained to offer motivational training to the convicted felons in preparation for the reentry to the society (Bigelow, 2008, p. 20).

The prison reform task force can also help in the successful reentry of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option by ensuring that programs for strengthening the understanding of the society and the families are implemented. This will help in the preparation for the reentry of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option (Bigelow, 2008, p. 27). The other way in which the prison reform task force can help is by expanding the treatment facilities to ensure that are the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are safe from mental illness and substance abuse since most of the prisoners in the U.S have had problems of substance abuse (Bigelow, 2008, p. 28). Family members of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option can also stay with them even if it is for a short term basis to help in the successful reentry of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option

The society should have programs such as assisting the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option in accessing transitional housing. The society should also help the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option in applying for the housing. There should also be programs that help in linking the society with the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option for a successful reentry process. The society should also help the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option in getting pre-release centers and halfway houses so as to help them and reduce the rates of the recidivism among the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option (Seiter & Kadela, 2003).

The society should provide the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option with housing to ensure that they are connected to services such as educations, treatment, social network and vocational programs due to motivation. When the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option are motivated by offering them housing programs, they will participate in personal development by increasing social bonds with the society which therefore ensures the reduction of the recidivism rate. When the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option have a connection with the community and relationship with the society that is healthy, there will be psychological and social reinforcement that will help in the reduction of crimes (Laub & Sampson, 2001). The society should also ensure that there are support systems that are constructive to help in the reduction of the recidivism and the violation rates among the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no option such as sexual violations (Andrews & Bonta, 2003; Hanson & Harris, 1998).

Plan/ProgramThe proposed program or plan would entail the tactics and activities which would be utilized to implement the goals and objectives. In this case the objective concerns convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options. Usually, convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison face a very challenging task of not only locating but also sustaining a housing they can afford. Offenders who have been put in prison are usually separated from both their families and the communities from where they belong, the consequence of which, after incarceration, the convicts end up not having any systems to support them according to Levenson et al, (2007).

            The results of the above incarceration are not only limited to the lack of support section, but also fiscal resources, opportunities of employment and transportation. Barriers to employment can usually lead to financial instability. Furthermore, finding affordable lodging is always very difficult owing to the fact that the law prohibits felons from acquiring subsidized housing (Legal Action Center, 2000). What this implies is that the fundamental needs of the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison have always been ignored. This has made many scholars warn of serious the consequences of such neglect. According to the scholars, the issue of housing is the main remedy which when provided for, would ensure the success of process of reintegration. If the issue of housing for the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options is not addressed, the society would be risking the safety of her public (Levenson et al, 2007).

            There is a clear relationship between housing instability and criminal recidivism according to many research studies. Residential instability was established to be good indicator of offence relapse among criminals in Georgia, with the probability of being arrested again increasing by 25% every time a parolee moved (California Department of Corrections, 1997). The implication for all these problems associated with convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options is a strong need for an implementation of several advocacy issues. According to Levenson et al, (2007), such advocacy issues which need to be implemented include support systems, housing, opportunities of employment, fiscal resources as well as transportation among other remedies.

The InterventionsAs earlier stated, one main concern facing convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options is the problem of affordable housing. Among other interventions, what needs to be understood is that housing and ownership of property create social bonds which are very important contributors towards the desistance from crime. At the same time, societal connections and string interpersonal relationships lead not only to social but also psychological reinforcements to the offender’s attempts to conformity and desistance from criminal tendencies (Levenson, et al, 2007).

            A detailed plan regarding the advocacy issue of housing and strong interpersonal relationships is therefore strongly needed. As an intervention, there is a dire need for strong advocacy aimed at strengthening community connections as well as promoting strong interpersonal relationships between the society and the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options. This advocacy would have the intention of creating social and psychological reinforcements which would deter the convicted felons from relapsing into crime (Levenson et al, 2007).

According to Levenson et al, (2007), this particular advocacy intervention should be planned and implemented and put in place to be embraced by the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options. This would go along way in stopping the convicts from committing other crimes. There is therefore a strong need for a detailed plan in support of the advocacy issue of employment opportunities creation as well as the support of marital relationships. These issues should be planned and implemented in advance so that by the time the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options are released, they are easily fully absorbed back into the society.

            The other advocacy issue of employment and relationship, more so marriage also forms part of another strong set of predicting factors which strongly contribute towards the desistance from crime of convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options. What this implies is that lifestyle instability has usually been linked with not only general but also sexual recidivism (Levenson et al, 2007). This has the implication that sexual offenders who have constructive support systems tend to undergo few violations and commit less offenses as opposed to those who do not have any such advocacy support.

            The other advocacy intervention would concern financial assistance to the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options. This intervention is informed by the fact that many of those who return from prison usually a lot of financial challenges (Travis, Solomon & Waul, 2001). At the same time, there is a strong need for policy change more so on the issue of the federal legislation which inhibit convicted felons from acquiring public housing (Legal Action Center, 2000). This policy needs to be changed in a bid to allow the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options to acquire affordable housing which would help them settle down.

             In a bit to provide financial assistance to the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options, the society should put in place specific programs aimed at availing money to the felons. These particular programs among many other interventions would go along way in availing financial stability to the convicted felons thus enabling them to have at least some money which they could use as security deposits for residential apartments. If such related measures are put in place, the tendencies to relapse among the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options would reduce tremendously (Seiter & Kadela, 2003).

             As clearly indicated, the main intervention program which needs to be planned and implemented in advance should address housing and homelessness for the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options. This would mean that assistance geared towards accessing transitional housing, processing of housing applications, as well as connection to the support system of the society would go along way in helping the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options to settle down (Seiter & Kadela, 2003).

           Those intervention programs not withstanding, there is still need for other intervention plans like pre-release centers as well as halfway houses, which would be very useful tools  in reducing rates of relapse. Finally, there is need to plan and implement the above intervention programs aimed at empowering the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options (Seiter & Kadela, 2003). Such empowering programs would help link the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options to fundamental services like educational and vocational programs, long-term housing as well as positive social networks among others.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the empirical studies on convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options have indicated more that enough evidence to suggest that residence restrictions lead to undesirable consequences to those who commit sexual offences among other offenders. These undesirable effects include homelessness, transience, unemployment as well as invalidity of registry. Other consequences include not being in a position to access social support besides the crowding of those who commit sexual offenses among other offences in poor and socially disorganized communities. Those in probation and community corrections should need to brace themselves for offering assistance to the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options with case management services (Hanson & Harris, 1998; 2001).

            At the same time, the study has established that housing plays a very important role in determining the probability of relapse among the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options more so within the first few months after their release when they have the strongest temptation to relapse. According to Seiter and Kadela, (2003), this has the implication that without the advantages inherent in possessing a decent and stable housing, convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options struggling to meet other psychological needs are faced with high probabilities of resorting back to their initial criminal tendencies. This would imply that providing the convicted felons returning home from jail and/or prison with no options with access to housing they can afford gives them the requisite stability they need thereby easing their transition back into their respective societies.

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