Compromise agreements

This text focuses on the friction between pro and anti nullification states as regards tariff and slave laws. Although the South was the first to escalate the issue of nullification concerning the tariff laws passed by President Jackson, the North also nullified fugitive slave laws. The text clearly shows how the nullification crisis was ended between South Carolina and the federal government. Although the resolution was deemed a compromise, this text shows the inequity of the stance between the state and the federal government – with President Jackson relying more on a show of force than actual compromise agreements.

Compston, Christine and Rachel Filene Seidman. Our Documents. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. This text contains a copy of the alien and sedition acts passed in 1798. The alien act gave the President of the United States the authority to deport any foreign national living with the territory of the United States during a war with the country from which the foreign national came. Such act thus extended to the President the power to declare foreign nationals as enemies of the state during states of national emergency related to the dealings with other nations.

The sedition act on the other hand extended the punishable acts of sedition provided in the already existing laws of the United States. This latter act thus imposed additional penalties for violators as well as more specific acts which were deemed violations. Cornell, Saul, David Staley, Ann Heiss and Meredith Clark-Wiltz. Retrieving the American Past. Boston: Pearson Custom Publishing, 2008. This text contained arguments for and against the sedition act passed by the federal republic in the 1790s.

The opinions of leading political figures at the time were shown in order to present the intent of the framers of the law as well as the problems that arose because of the approval of said law. The main issue of the debate was the need of this subsequent definition and penalization of seditious acts – implying that the previous laws providing for said felony were not sufficient to cover the range of offenses that might be encountered in relation thereto.

The text thus provides good background for the rationale behind the subsequent resolutions issued in answer to the sedition act. Lence, Ross M. Union and Liberty: The Political Philosophy of John C. Calhoun. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1992. This text focuses on the role that Vice President Calhoun played in providing South Carolina with a platform to act against the tariff impositions of the federal government. Calhoun was the proponent of the nullification doctrine which was later used to declare as void the tariff law imposed by the administration of President Jackson.

However, the stand-off between the federal government and the State of South Carolina drew to a close with the power of nullification being negated. The tariff debate was not the deciding act however as the Civil War was the event which finally put to a rest all talks of secession from the United States as well as nullification of decrees of the federal government. BIBLIOGRAPHY Amendments to the Constitution Proposed by the Hartford Convention, 1814. Available from The Avalon Project, http://www. yale.

edu/lawweb/avalon/amerdoc/hartconv. htm Boyer, Paul S. , Clifford E. Clark, Jr. , Joseph F. Kett, Neal Salisbury, Harvard Sitkoff, and Nancy Woloch. The Enduring Vision: A History of the American People. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin Company, 2008. Brinkley, Alan. American History: A Survey. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1991. Calhoun, John C. “States Rights and Nullification. ” States Rights and Nullification 1, issue 5 (1997): 193-211. Compston, Christine and Rachel Filene Seidman. Our Documents. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Cornell, Saul, David Staley, Ann Heiss and Meredith Clark-Wiltz. Retrieving the American Past. Boston: Pearson Custom Publishing, 2008. Kentucky Resolution: 1799. Database on-line. Available from The Avalon Project, http://www. yale. edu/lawweb/avalon/kenres. htm Lence, Ross M. Union and Liberty: The Political Philosophy of John C. Calhoun. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1992. “Nullification. ” Microsoft Encarta 2006 [CD]. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Corporation, 2005. President Jackson’s Proclamation Regarding Nullification, December 10, 1832.

Database on-line. Available from The Avalon Project, http://www. yale. edu/lawweb/avalon/presiden/proclamations/jack01. htm South Carolina Ordinance of Nullification, November 24, 1832. Database on-line. Available from The Avalon Project, http://www. yale. edu/lawweb/avalon/states/sc/ordnull. htm Virgina Resolution: 1798. Database on-line. Available from The Avalon Project, http://www. yale. edu/lawweb/avalon/virres. htm. Weisberger, Bernard A. “The Nullifiers. ” American Heritage 46, issue 6 (1995): 20-21.