The Core issue of the Case Study

Missouri alleges that ku Klux Klan cannot be assigned any part of the highway due to the previous history of Klan, Missouri argued that ku Klux Klan had been discriminating the racial minorities, by committing violent acts against them, hence violating the anti-discrimination laws.  On the other hand, ku Klux Klan argues that it had not been discrimination or violating any anti-discrimination laws, but was just expressing its views in its actions.  The courts in responding to the issue have stated that, denial of the Klan's application was unconstitutional, and that Klan had only been acting on its views.

Application of Crooks Discussion

In his writing, Crook focuses on value in decision making, other than following the duty for moral decision making.  Crook provides the a method for decision making that should be adopted by Christians, and applies this to some of the vital issues in the society today.  His approach is mainly based on the teachings of St. Paul statement, “ For in Christ Jesus... the only thing that counts is faith working through love.”

Crook's theme therefore gives Christians a moral obligation in the making of decisions[1].  From this view, the courts should have made their decision in looking at the moral and ethical obligations, rather than considering the protection accorded by the constitution, which may end up not producing fair and justifiable results in the community.

From this approach, if it is true that ku Klux Klan was committing violent acts against the racial minorities, the organization needed to be denied the the designated section 1-55, that was used for bussing St. Louis black students.  According to Crook, such a decision should be arrived at through love and faith, and by ensuring that even the minor races are protected in the community[2].  Crook's idea is therefore disagrees the provisions of the fifth Amendment, due to the fact that, freedom of speech and views should not be approved if they do not conform with moral values, if such a provision is oppressive to a group of people in the society, it should not be allowed.

Application of Jung & Jung Discussion

 Jung in his writing talks about the four judgmental functions in decision making.  He states that the two ways followed by people in the making of decisions include 'intuition' and 'sensing'.  Sensing involves the use of data, either remembered or real-time.  Intuition on the other hand refers to paying attention to the inner voice and its capability to recognize patterns, than use of the sensory impressions.  Judgmental functions according to Jung are therefore ways of making decisions based on data, and by applying the information on our conscious mind.  Jung also asserts that people may make decisions based on other things other than feeling or thinking[3].

For instance, a person may choose to possess something as it looks good, he termed this as irrational decision making.  From Jung's point of view, the Missouri argument about the previous history of discrimination and violence against the racial minority should have been considered, instead of only focusing on the provisions of the Fifth Amendment.

Ethical Dilemma Faced by Leaders in Decision Making

Leaders are always faced with ethical dilemmas in the making of decisions intended to solve certain problems in the society they live in.  Whether a leader is a religious one or a legal one, they all have guidelines to direct them while making decisions.  Legal leaders as people with the responsibility to enforce the law are supposed to follow the provisions of the statues, in the making of their decisions.  Religious leaders on the other hand are supposed to follow the Bible as their law[4].

It is therefore apparent that a legal leader may be faced with a situation where it is clear that a certain decision made by following the law of the land might not lead to moral decision making.  At the same time, the leader may be tied not to follow any other way, as the law of the land must be complied with.  Other decisions made following the religious approach may also not be sufficient in the solving of a certain problem in the society.  Where the religious view may advocate the making of decisions through faith and love as St. Paul advocates, there may be need to punish the wrong doer and compensate the victim, in order to realize justice.

 An Appropriate Solution For the Case

In the making of a decision concerning the Missouri and ku Klux Klan case, it would have been wise for the courts to consider the previous history and records of the ku Klux Klan, in order to consider whether the company was qualified to be assigned section 1-55 along the pathway.  In the making of decisions, it has been the tradition of most courts to look into the past records of the defendants.  This is really helpful in guiding the courts, as it may help to establish the character and behavior of the defendant, and the future likely hood of committing an alleged crime[5].

The courts in this case should have also made a good interpretation of the law.  Studies have been shown that, there are various techniques of interpreting the law, at times words interpreted on their own without looking at the entire writing, or in reference to other statues may not lead to the intended intentions of the writer.  The provisions of freedom to speech and expression have their limits in law.  If speech and expression is exercised to the detriment of others, such freedom should be denied.  If the courts followed the above directions, it ought to have solved the case by ensuring justice and fairness to both parties.

Word Count: 955.

Bibliography

Adolphus E., Crooks, R., & Hodgins, A. The Journal of Education: Moral Decision    making. Ontario Dept. of Education. New York: Published by Harper & brothers,   1890.

Crooks, R, The Life of Bishop Matthew Simpson: Of the Methodist Episcopal Church. New York: Published by Harper & brothers, 1890, Digitized 2007.

Jung & Jung, A Journey of Transformation : Exploring His Life and Experiencing His Ideas      Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2004.

Paul Tillich, "Being and Love," in Moral Principles of Action, ed. Ruth N. Anshen. New          York: Harper & Bros., 2003.

Robert D, Jung for Septics: Jung's Psychological Types as Decision-making Preferences         Chicago: American Library Association, 2006.

[1]             Crooks, R, The Life of Bishop Matthew Simpson: Of the Methodist Episcopal Church.     (New York: Published by Harper & brothers, 1890, Digitized 2007), p102-122. [2]             Adolphus E., Crooks, R., & Hodgins, A. The Journal of Education: Moral Decision making. Ontario Dept. of Education. (New York: Published by Harper & brothers, 1890), p37. [3]             Jung & Jung, A Journey of Transformation : Exploring His Life and Experiencing His Ideas (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2004), p306-311. [4]             Paul Tillich, "Being and Love," in Moral Principles of Action, ed. Ruth N. Anshen (New York: Harper & Bros., 2003), p106-110. [5]             Robert D,  Jung for Septics: Jung's Psychological Types as Decision-making Preferences (Chicago: American Library Association, 2006), MD586.