De Jonge v. Oregon

PETITIONER: De Jonge
RESPONDENT: Oregon
LOCATION:

DOCKET NO.: 123
DECIDED BY: Hughes Court (1932-1937)
LOWER COURT:

ARGUED: Dec 09, 1936
DECIDED: Jan 04, 1937

Facts of the case

On July 27, 1934, at a meeting held by the Communist Party, Dirk De Jonge addressed the audience regarding jail conditions in the county and a maritime strike in progress in Portland. While the meeting was in progress, police raided it. De Jonge was arrested and charged with violating the State's criminal syndicalism statute. The law defines criminal syndicalism as "the doctrine which advocates crime, physical violence, sabotage or any unlawful acts or methods as a means of accomplishing or effecting industrial or political change or revolution." After being convicted, De Jonge moved for an acquittal, arguing that the evidence was insufficient to warrant his conviction. Disagreeing, the State Supreme Court distinguished that the indictment did not charge De Jonge with criminal syndicalism, but rather that he presided at, conducted and assisted in conducting an assemblage of persons, organization, society and group called by the Communist Party, which was unlawfully teaching and advocating in Multnomah county the doctrine of criminal syndicalism and sabotage.

Question

Does Oregon's criminal syndicalism statute violate the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment?