Case study for people resourcing

Introduction

The paper is an examination of a resourcing plan for East London Life; a Museum that is scheduled to participate in the 2012 select committee known as the International Conventional Centre. This paper will outline some of the overall objectives that need to be taken into account during the sourcing process, the costs and timescales that have to be accounted for. Besides this, it will also be imperative to look into some of the risks involved in the sourcing process and how to minimise these risks.

Resourcing plan for the International Convention centre

The nature of the Olympics necessitates a human resource plan that would prevent the International Convention Centre for being reactive and would change them to becoming proactive. If this group merely deals with Human resource issues on a day to day basis, then they are bound to perform very poorly in the end. The plan will go a long way in preventing some of the frustrations that arise out of haphazard HR sourcing. (Shoebridge & Ferguson, 1997)

The first step in the plan in outlining the process of employee sourcing for the International Convention Centre is having overall goals and specific objectives. In this case, the main objective is to obtain a comprehensive, well prepared team to organize the International Convention centre for the 2012 Olympics.  In order to achieve such an objective, it will be imperative to adhere to the following specific goals

·        Incorporate the needs of the organisation

·        Meet the needs of each particular job description

·        Deal with all of the needs of the ICC through the employees sourced

It should be noted that no plan will be effective if there is a failure to consider some of the past challenges and issues involved in the process of employee sourcing. Consequently, an examination of what has been happening in the respective organisations and companies participating n the group will need to be done. Since particular emphasis will be given to East London Life in this plan, then the company’s human resource team would have to be consulted on some of the challenges that they met along the way over the past five years when sourcing for clients.

In this regard, the needs assessment part of the plan for East London Life may encompass; having adequate and well qualified staff in the following areas; the museum, the coffee bar and the art gallery. Part of the reason why this might be a fresh challenge in the ICC is that the expected visitors to East London Life during the Olympics will be much higher than what the current staff are used.

There will be a need to have extra support from new members and there will also be a need for adequate preparation among the present staff. It is essential to ensure that the workforce and the labour needs match and this will be the most important role of the needs assessment phase. (Elwood, 2003)

It should also be noted assessment will not just be for the employees who will take part in the ICC. This aspect of the plan also needs to include the strengths and weaknesses of oneself as a business resource consultant. The first major weakness is that this sourcing plan will have to include the needs of other members of the ICC other than east Life London yet there so little information known about them.

However, this issue can be mitigated by frequently communicating with the other organisations in order to enhance the human resource experience. Another internal problem that will be particularly challenging is the fact that the roles and needs of the members are not yet defined. This will be a bit difficult to tackle but can be mitigated by consulting with the respective parties. Some external problems that may interfere with the plan include market conditions; with the state of the global economy, it may be difficult to fully account for the sourcing costs. (Nadler, 2004)

The needs assessment phase needs to be given adequate time so as to consult with other members of the team that will be involved in the process of adopting some of the next approaches involved in the sourcing process.

After conducting a needs assessment, then the nest phase in the sourcing process will be conducting a job description. This will be possible by examining all categories required. Some of the positions are of a supervisory nature while others are considered to be in the entry level. In order for this aspect to work, a thorough analysis of the duties and skills entailed in each job need to be accurately recorded. This should then be supported by listing down minimum experience and academic qualifications required to complete each set of jobs.

It is also particularly important to account for the salary of the future employees within both East London Life and the entire International Convention Centre. In order to ensure that members are adequately satisfied with their job, it will be necessary to offer a practical salary for most of them. This is because most human resource managers tend to think that they may adjust salaries as time progresses. However, this is a big impediment to the success of the HR plan since low salaries tend to attract average candidates to fill in available positions. Those who may highly qualified may not opt to do the job.

The following are some of the details that will be included in the job description

-Benefits to be offered to candidates

-Employees’ duties

-Monetary values associated with each position

This aspect may not be very difficult for the ICC association because most of the constituent companies have been conducting their own job analyses, consequently, their past history will be useful in the process. On the other hand, it should be noted that some of the position in the International Convention Centre will be particularly unique to the organisation. There will be a need to look into all aspects of the Olympics coordination process and then fill in the gaps. It is likely that for this particular kind of association, there may be a need to engage in consultation between the existing committee members on the roles and duties of the employees. (Kelly, 2001)

Communication is a vital process of the human resource plan for this group. Consequently, telling members about the job descriptions and analyses verbally may not be well received. This is because many people may interpret it in a different way. Consequently, the best way to go about it is by writing an employee handbook. This will contain a summary of the rules and regulations involved in the recruitment process. Additionally, the handbook will also work in the reverse by allowing employees to describe or write down their understanding of the job. This can make them more participatory and involved in the process.

It should also be noted that the issue of employee training also falls in this category. Since members of the International Convention Centre will be coming from various organisations that will be focusing on different gaols and aspirations, then it is imperative to align some of these gaols to the 2012 Olympics. In the case of East London Life, training on how to handle large sizes of clients will be imperative for the museum, meeting room, coffee bar and arts centre employees.

Besides this, it will be imperative for the committee members to have an idea of how to handle foreign members. All in all, the job analyses phase of this plan is likely to take up three months. This will be important in order to ensure that all the aspects are adequately covered. (Oheery & Noon, 2008)

The next aspect in the plan is the recruitment phase. Here, greater emphasis will be given to synchronising the needs of the committee with the needs of the potential employees. The first thing to be done is to list down the requirements of each job online by building a profile for all the available positions.

On the other hand, employees will also need to do their part by including some of the skills and experiences they have to handle the challenges of the International Conventional Centre. Only those candidates who have the right matches will be contacted for further action. This aspect is likely to take a period of three months too. Since the committee must be chosen quickly, then it is imperative to reduce time spent in this area.

However, because the positions to be filled will be so important, then adequate time needs to be given to such conditions. Consequently, three months may be seen as a merger between the need to fill in positions urgently prior to the Olympics and the need to attract the best candidate for the job.

After the online job matches, then the hiring process will be next most important step, here candidates will be required to demonstrate their full capabilities through a three step process that will include;

·        Interview and testing

·        Reference check of the potential employee

·        Formal offer to stay with the organisation

Interviews will take a period of one hour for each candidate and they will be done very comprehensively. Most of the questions asked in the interview will rotate around three major aspects that include knowledge of the job, the skills that a candidate possesses and the candidate’s ability to work and collaborate with other people. The questions to be asked in the interview process will mostly be open ended and they will be rated depending on the candidate’s performance.

The candidates will also be required to demonstrate their abilities through testing. Practical positions such as those ones in East London’s coffee bar will require an enactment of real life scenario in which the candidates are required to act. For example, the new employees for the museum may be asked to take a team of twenty people on tour etc. (Adler, 1991)

After assessing that candidates meet all these requirements, and then it will be imperative to make a list of the most appropriate candidates and decided on the most suitable. This should then be followed by a thorough check on the references suggested by that particular employee. Care should be taken to ensure that the employees have an ability to comply with overall needs of the organisation. This phase may take a period of two weeks because the interviews will be conducted continually for all the positions.

Costs in the hiring process must also be considered adequately. For managerial positions, the amount of money spent in the human resource effort is likely to reach two hundred and fifty percent of what the employees will be enumerated. However, for the other non managerial posts, then this may reach around one hundred and fifty percent. Assuming that the average salary for managerial employees in the International Conventional Centre is thirty thousand pounds annually, then the cost of investing in this human resource may reach forty thousand pounds. Assuming that the International Conventional Centre will comprise of one hundred managerial positions, then the cost will reach an average of four point five million pounds.

Short term contracts will be an important factor in the human resource plan. This is because for the employer, short term contracts allow covering staff absence challenges that may arise; they allow coping with jobs that are time constrained as is the case with the Olympics. Additionally, if employees are funded by external sources, the short term contracts may be lucrative. Short term contracts are also quite appropriate for particular projects and since the Olympics may be regarded as such then they can prove to be beneficial. (Adler, 1991)

On the other hand, short term contracts may be problematic when the employer wants to use them to deny his or her employees rights to the organisation. Additionally, they may be problematic when the affected persons feel as though their employees are trying to undermine their rights through offering them temporary options. Besides this, it can also create problems when the period seems extended. In this case, some members of the committee will be required to continue offering their services and the short term contract may not be very viable for them.

Conclusion

The Olympics 2012 will present a series of unique challenges to members of the International Conventional centre. In order to ensure that all these challenges are accounted for, then a comprehensive human resource plan needs to be taken into account. It will include a needs assessment phase, job analyses and descriptions, recruitment, hiring and testing. A short term contract may be what works best for this group since the project will be only for four years.

References

Shoebridge, N. & Ferguson, A. (1997): Rise of the baby-boom bosses; Business Review Weekly, p 28-34.

Kelly, D. (2001): Dual Perceptions of HRD: Issues for Policy; Routledge

Nadler, L. (2004): The Handbook of Human resource management; John Wiley and Sons

Elwood, F. (2003): Trends toward a Closer Integration of Education and Human Resources Development; Vocational and Technical Education, 12, 2, 7

Oheery, E. & Noon, M. (2008): A Dictionary of Human Resource Management; Oxford Publishers

Adler, N. (1991): International dimensions of organizational behaviour; PWS-Kent Publishing Company.