15 basic appeals

Advertisements are part of our everyday lives. From the moment that we step outside we are surrounded by ads posted on billboards to transportation to even blimps or jets painting the sky with car insurance propaganda. In the article, “Advertising’s fifteen basic appeals” Jib Fowels explains that the goal of the advertiser is to convince the consumer through physiological and psychological levels. By doing so the advertisement would have to include one or two of the basic appeals Jib Fowels listed in his article.

A few examples of these are the need to nurture, the need for sex, need for escape or need to affiliate. As I read through a Women Health magazine 3 out these 15 appeals stood out to me the most. The first appeal is the need to achieve, which is the ability to accomplish something difficult and succeed identifies the product with winning. Sports figures as spokespersons project this image. The first advertisement I’d like to point out is an ad about chocolate milk. The ad itself takes up two pages and is in black and white; everything but the glass of chocolate milk.

In big white letters it says “My After” with a picture of ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae drinking the milk. She is a fit and healthy young woman which allows consumers, more likely women, to want to be like her. Also that by drinking chocolate milk they can achieve her stunning physique. Another ad I noticed was one of a university, university of phoenix to be exact. This ad portrays a picture of an intelligent looking young woman walking down the street and right in the middle of the page she quotes “Instead of telling my kids how important education is, I am showing them.

” This ad also targets the female audience by inspiring specifically women with kids by saying that it’s not too late to go to college. Women want to be like her and achieve their goals by attending college and being a role model to their children. The last ad is one about the G series fit drink by Gatorade. On the center of the page is a picture of a g series carton dripping in beads of water, and in the background lay a pair of boxing gloves. To the bottom right of the ad it says “The protein to recover from your workout without the calories to kill it.

” This ad targets anyone who is trying to get fit or get better at boxing. The advertiser is saying that by drinking their product you can achieve larger muscles. The second appeal that I identified in this magazine is the need for prominence which means we want to be admired and respected; to have high social status. Tasteful china and classic diamonds offer this potential. The first ad is one of a car; the Suzuki grand vitra. This ad shows a picture of a large silver compact SUV driving through a river in what seems to be a very green and tropical setting.

This ad is targeting people with big families because it does look like a family friendly car. This ad shows need for prominence because this car look very flashy, and most people want a car that can sustain anything. It adds to the value of the car, and the more valuable the car the higher the social status. The ad also says is bold white font “It’s ready for anything are you? ” which is claiming that it is sustainable. Another advertisement is one of ikea. The setting is in a backyard on a warm summer’s day, and it shows a set of white patio furniture in the center of the backyard.

This set of patio furniture looks like it very good quality and will make your house look of higher value. This targets all people in search for good quality furniture. This makes the audience feel like they need it in order to have a high social status. The last example of need for prominence I found was an ad for the citizen watch company. This ad shows a picture of Paula Creamer, Champion professional golfer dressed in golf attire. Right below her is an image of a beautiful silver watch. To the right of the watch is says “Unstoppable. Paula creamer is.

So is her citizen eco drive. Fueled by light, it never needs a battery. IT’S UNSTOPABLE. Just like the people who wear it. ” This flashy watch makes women especially want to buy it. Since a very iconic golfer wears it, it will boost up their social status is they wear it too. The most seen appeal throughout this magazine would have to be psychological needs which is what Fowles defines as sex (item no. 1) as a biological need, and so he classifies our need to sleep, eat, and drink in this category. Advertisers for juicy pizza are especially appealing late at night.